abject

(redirected from abjeck)

abject

debasing, degrading; contemptible; despicable: an abject liar; miserable; wretched: abject poverty
Not to be confused with:
object – a thing or person to which an action is directed: an object of affection; target; destination; intention; motive
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

ab·ject

 (ăb′jĕkt′, ăb-jĕkt′)
adj.
1. Extremely contemptible or degrading: abject cowardice. See Synonyms at base2.
2. Being of the most miserable kind; wretched: abject poverty; abject grief.
3. Thoroughgoing; complete. Used to modify pejorative nouns: an abject failure.
4. Extremely submissive or self-abasing: abject apologies.

[Middle English, outcast, from Latin abiectus, past participle of abicere, to cast away : ab-, from; see ab-1 + iacere, to throw; see yē- in Indo-European roots.]

ab′ject′ly adv.
ab·ject′ness n.
ab·jec′tion n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

abject

(ˈæbdʒɛkt)
adj
1. utterly wretched or hopeless
2. miserable; forlorn; dejected
3. indicating humiliation; submissive: an abject apology.
4. contemptible; despicable; servile: an abject liar.
[C14: (in the sense: rejected, cast out): from Latin abjectus thrown or cast away, from abjicere, from ab- away + jacere to throw]
abˈjection n
ˈabjectly adv
ˈabjectness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ab•ject

(ˈæb dʒɛkt, æbˈdʒɛkt)

adj.
1. utterly hopeless or wretched: abject poverty.
2. contemptible; despicable: an abject coward.
3. servile; submissive; slavish.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin abjectus, past participle of abicere, abjicere to hurl, throw down, debase =ab- ab- + -jicere, comb. form of jacere to throw]
ab•ject′ly, adv.
ab•ject′ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.abject - of the most contemptible kindabject - of the most contemptible kind; "abject cowardice"; "a low stunt to pull"; "a low-down sneak"; "his miserable treatment of his family"; "You miserable skunk!"; "a scummy rabble"; "a scurvy trick"
contemptible - deserving of contempt or scorn
2.abject - most unfortunate or miserableabject - most unfortunate or miserable; "the most abject slaves joined in the revolt"; "abject poverty"
unfortunate - not favored by fortune; marked or accompanied by or resulting in ill fortune; "an unfortunate turn of events"; "an unfortunate decision"; "unfortunate investments"; "an unfortunate night for all concerned"
3.abject - showing utter resignation or hopelessnessabject - showing utter resignation or hopelessness; "abject surrender"
hopeless - without hope because there seems to be no possibility of comfort or success; "in an agony of hopeless grief"; "with a hopeless sigh he sat down"
4.abject - showing humiliation or submissivenessabject - showing humiliation or submissiveness; "an abject apology"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

abject

adjective
1. wretched, miserable, hopeless, dismal, outcast, pitiful, forlorn, deplorable, pitiable Both of them died in abject poverty.
3. despicable, base, degraded, worthless, vile, sordid, debased, reprehensible, contemptible, dishonourable, ignoble, detestable, scungy (Austral. & N.Z.) the kind of abject low-life that preys on children
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
بَائِس، مُدْقَع
ubohý
elendigusselynkelig
hörmungar-, eymdar-
apgailėtinaiapgailėtinasvarganaivarganas
nožēlojams

abject

[ˈæbdʒekt] ADJ
1. (= wretched) [condition] → deplorable; [state] → lamentable
England's abject performance in the World Cupla pésima actuación de Inglaterra en el Mundial
2. (= grovelling) → sumiso
an abject slave to fashionun esclavo sumiso de la moda
he sounded abjectsu tono era sumiso y arrepentido
we received an abject apology from the travel companyrecibimos una carta de la agencia de viajes deshaciéndose en disculpas
3. (as intensifier) [misery, failure] → absoluto; [stupidity] → supino; [cowardice] → abyecto, vil (liter); [surrender] → indigno
to live in abject povertyvivir en la miseria más absoluta
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

abject

[ˈæbdʒɛkt] adj
[poverty] → sordide
[failure, defeat] → pitoyable; [surrender] → pitoyable; [performance] → pitoyable
[terror, humiliation] → pitoyable
[coward] → méprisable
an abject apology → une excuse plate
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

abject

adj
(= wretched) state, liar, thiefelend, erbärmlich; povertybitter; failurekläglich
(= servile) submission, apologydemütig; person, gestureunterwürfig
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

abject

[ˈæbdʒɛkt] (frm) adj (poverty) → abietto/a; (apology) → umiliante; (coward) → indegno/a, vile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

abject

(ˈӕbdʒekt) adjective
miserable; wretched. abject poverty.
ˈabjectly adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.