abjure

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abjure

repudiate, recant, or retract; to renounce under oath, forswear: abjure allegiance; abjure a confession
Not to be confused with:
adjure – to charge or command earnestly, often under the threat of a penalty; to entreat solemnly: to adjure the witness to tell the truth
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

ab·jure

 (ăb-jo͝or′)
tr.v. ab·jured, ab·jur·ing, ab·jures
1. To recant solemnly; renounce or repudiate: "For nearly 21 years after his resignation as Prime Minister in 1963, he abjured all titles, preferring to remain just plain 'Mr.'" (Time).
2. To renounce under oath; forswear.

[Middle English abjuren, from Old French abjurer, from Latin abiūrāre : ab-, away; see ab-1 + iūrāre, to swear; see yewes- in Indo-European roots.]

ab′ju·ra′tion n.
ab·jur′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

abjure

(əbˈdʒʊə)
vb (tr)
1. to renounce or retract, esp formally, solemnly, or under oath
2. to abstain from or reject
[C15: from Old French abjurer or Latin abjurāre to deny on oath]
ˌabjuˈration n
abˈjurer n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ab•jure

(æbˈdʒʊər, -ˈdʒɜr)

v.t. -jured, -jur•ing.
1. to repudiate or retract, esp. with formal solemnity; recant.
2. to renounce or give up under oath; forswear: to abjure allegiance to a country.
3. to refrain from; avoid.
[1400–50; < Latin abjūrāre to deny on oath =ab- ab- + jūrāre to swear; see jury1]
ab•jur′a•to`ry, adj.
ab•jur′er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

abjure


Past participle: abjured
Gerund: abjuring

Imperative
abjure
abjure
Present
I abjure
you abjure
he/she/it abjures
we abjure
you abjure
they abjure
Preterite
I abjured
you abjured
he/she/it abjured
we abjured
you abjured
they abjured
Present Continuous
I am abjuring
you are abjuring
he/she/it is abjuring
we are abjuring
you are abjuring
they are abjuring
Present Perfect
I have abjured
you have abjured
he/she/it has abjured
we have abjured
you have abjured
they have abjured
Past Continuous
I was abjuring
you were abjuring
he/she/it was abjuring
we were abjuring
you were abjuring
they were abjuring
Past Perfect
I had abjured
you had abjured
he/she/it had abjured
we had abjured
you had abjured
they had abjured
Future
I will abjure
you will abjure
he/she/it will abjure
we will abjure
you will abjure
they will abjure
Future Perfect
I will have abjured
you will have abjured
he/she/it will have abjured
we will have abjured
you will have abjured
they will have abjured
Future Continuous
I will be abjuring
you will be abjuring
he/she/it will be abjuring
we will be abjuring
you will be abjuring
they will be abjuring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been abjuring
you have been abjuring
he/she/it has been abjuring
we have been abjuring
you have been abjuring
they have been abjuring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been abjuring
you will have been abjuring
he/she/it will have been abjuring
we will have been abjuring
you will have been abjuring
they will have been abjuring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been abjuring
you had been abjuring
he/she/it had been abjuring
we had been abjuring
you had been abjuring
they had been abjuring
Conditional
I would abjure
you would abjure
he/she/it would abjure
we would abjure
you would abjure
they would abjure
Past Conditional
I would have abjured
you would have abjured
he/she/it would have abjured
we would have abjured
you would have abjured
they would have abjured
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.abjure - formally reject or disavow a formerly held belief, usually under pressureabjure - formally reject or disavow a formerly held belief, usually under pressure; "He retracted his earlier statements about his religion"; "She abjured her beliefs"
repudiate, disown, renounce - cast off; "She renounced her husband"; "The parents repudiated their son"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

abjure

verb
2. refrain from, avoid, eschew, abstain from, abnegate countries whose officials abjure bribery
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

abjure

verb
To disavow (something previously written or said) irrevocably and usually formally:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

abjure

[əbˈdʒʊəʳ] VT (frm) → renunciar a, abjurar de
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

abjure

[æbˈdʒʊər] vtrenoncer à (par serment ou publiquement)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

abjure

vtabschwören (+dat)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

abjure

[əbˈdʒuəʳ] vt (frm) → abiurare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Zarathustra abjures all those who would fain turn an IMPERSONAL eye upon nature and contemplate her phenomena with that pure objectivity to which the scientific idealists of to-day would so much like to attain.
Once a man has lost his self-respect, and has decided to abjure his better qualities and human dignity, he falls headlong, and cannot choose but do so.
To gaze into the depths of blue of the child's eyes and pronounce their loveliness a trick of premature cunning was to be guilty of a cynicism in preference to which I naturally preferred to abjure my judgment and, so far as might be, my agitation.
That was the cause, but yet per accidens; For, when we hear one rack the name of God, Abjure the Scriptures and his Saviour Christ, We fly, in hope to get his glorious soul; Nor will we come, unless he use such means Whereby he is in danger to be damn'd.
And while I suffer thus, there comes no ray Of hope to gladden me athwart the gloom; Nor do I look for it in my despair; But rather clinging to a cureless woe, All hope do I abjure for evermore.
When I found that he was a Catholic I was almost ready to abjure the Protestant religion for his sake; but I perceived that this was not necessary when I came to know that most of his friends were Protestants.
With one word, by drawing one mournful face, I could have got my mother to abjure the jam-shelf - nay, I might have managed it by merely saying that she had enjoyed 'The Master of Ballantrae.' For you must remember that she only read it to persuade herself (and me) of its unworthiness, and that the reason she wanted to read the others was to get further proof.
And after listening attentively for some time Coifi again cried out, "'I advise, O King, that we instantly abjure and set fire to those temples and altars which we have consecrated without reaping any benefit from them.'