ablated


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ab·late

 (ă-blāt′)
v. ab·lat·ed, ab·lat·ing, ab·lates
v.tr.
1. Medicine To remove or destroy the function of (a body organ or tissue).
2. To remove by erosion, melting, evaporation, or vaporization.
v.intr.
To become ablated; undergo ablation.

[Back-formation from ablation.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ablated - made smaller or less by melting or erosion or vaporizationablated - made smaller or less by melting or erosion or vaporization; "the rocket's ablated head shield"
decreased, reduced - made less in size or amount or degree
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The incidence of all-cause mortality during follow-up was 43% lower in the ablated HF patients, compared with the controls, Douglas L.
The incidence of all-cause mortality during follow-up was 43% lower in the ablated heart failure patients, compared with the controls, Douglas L.
Sixty Macrobrachium rosenbergii females weighing 15.6 [+ or -] 0.3 g were divided into an unablated group (no eyestalk ablation; n = 30) and an ablated group (unilateral eyestalk ablation; n = 30).
The keyhole procedure involved three incisions in the abdomen and the endometriosis and adhesions were cut out or ablated. It took a couple of hours and I needed four weeks to recover and another five months to fully return to normal.
Methods: The data of NSCLC patients ablated for adrenal metastasis at the Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology, General Hospital Sotiria, were retrospectively analyzed.
A few works have paid attentions to the mechanisms that govern the evolutions of ablated shape and microstructures [12-15].
In radio frequency (RF) ablation, which is currently the most spread ablation modality, the ablation occurs in the near proximity (a few millimeters) of an electrode with an applied alternating current (in the 350-500 kHz frequency range), but a larger area is actually ablated thanks to thermal conduction, provided that involved tissues exhibit sufficient thermal conductivity.
The second sample has been ablated with a marking laser before joining.
There were 46, 12 and 2 total wedge-jumps recorded for the control, ablated, and sham-ablated treatments, respectively.
Various types of fibroids were ablated significantly differently (F=3.406, Pless than 0.05) by HIFUA that was most effective for ablating the subserosal ones.
These new materials can be easily ablated by a wide variety of low power lasers, provide flexible, high temperature alternatives to polyester and acrylic LML and are more durable than traditional thermal transfer printed label materials.