aboriginalism

aboriginalism

(ˌæbəˈrɪdʒɪnəlɪzəm)
n
a view of aboriginal cultures as being primitive and exotic, and having little to do with the modern world
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
in the Canadian context, 'aboriginalism' is a legal, political and cultural discourse designed to serve an agenda of silent surrender to an inherently unjust relation to the root of the colonial state itself...Consequently, there are many 'aboriginals' (in Canada) or 'Native Americans' (in the United States) who identify themselves solely by their political-legal relationship to the state rather than by any cultural or social ties to their Indigenous community or culture or homeland.
Though I was Ojibway, not Cree, I still couldn't help feeling that my respect and Aboriginalism was being called into question.
Aboriginalism, with its roots in this dichotomizing essentialism, plays the perfect foil to the Euroamerican mentality.
(2003) that set 'resource peripheries' apart from core regions: industrialism (the economic dimension), environmentalism (the environmental dimension), aboriginalism (the cultural dimension) and imperialism (the geopolitical dimension).
He terms this malady "aboriginalism": "the ideology of the Onkwehonwe surrender to the social and mental pathologies that have come to define colonized indigenous existences and the inauthentic, disconnected lives too many of our people find themselves leading." To be "aboriginal" is to accept a subject-position constructed and defined by mainstream Canadian society that is really just an updated version of Indian.
The book is extensively end-noted (there are 347 notes) but its field of reference is quite narrow, making the bibliography less 'select' than a 'selective' list of authors within a field that spans contemporary 'Aboriginalism' and its critique.
That both of these positions rely on static constructions of Aboriginalism, of a culture unchanged over thousands of years, betrays the utopian spatialization of a fantasy common to both.
In contrast, my argument interprets the war in the woods as the local expression of globalization that is created by complex new clashes among the forces of neo-liberalism, environmentalism and aboriginalism that in one way or another are transforming resource economies around the world.
In the title of her introduction: 'After Aboriginalism: Power, knowledge and Indigenous critical writing', Grossman captures how Edward Said's concept of 'otherness' has been integrated into the critical framework adopted by many of the contributors.
Actually, Graburn's thesis was reformulated long ago by the postmodern perspective (represented best by John Fiske) that television viewers are intellectual creators in their own right and more important than contentin determining the open-ended meanings of news stories Anthropologists whose research on television deserved closer attention include most obviously the late Eric Michaels in Australia and his critics, making an analogy wi th Orientalism, who accuse him of "Aboriginalism." Alia also seems to have overlooked the comprehensive report on Native Communications Societies in Canada undertaken by Robert Rupert for the Secretary of State in 1982.
We might well be instruments of the 'Aboriginalism' which Attwood, following Said's concept of Orientalism (1978), has described as 'a hegemonic system of theory and practice which has permeated colonial structures in which power, knowledge and Aboriginal terms of existence are mutually constitutive' (Attwood l992:ii-iii).
Full browser ?