aboriginally


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ab·o·rig·i·nal

 (ăb′ə-rĭj′ə-nəl)
adj.
1. Having existed in a region from the beginning: aboriginal forests. See Synonyms at native.
2.
a. Of or relating to aborigines.
b. often Aboriginal Of or relating to the indigenous peoples of Australia.
n.
also Aboriginal An aborigine.

ab′o·rig′i·nal·ly adv.
References in classic literature ?
I think this must be admitted, when we find that there are hardly any domestic races, either amongst animals or plants, which have not been ranked by some competent judges as mere varieties, and by other competent judges as the descendants of aboriginally distinct species.
The almost entire absence of associated grasses, which forms so remarkable a feature in the vegetation of this island, may perhaps be accounted for by the land having been aboriginally covered with forest-trees.
In seventy-five of the seventy-six judicial rulings produced over the course of the Pickton trial and appeals, there is no reference to the Aboriginally of these women.
The recent creation of Nunavut and its grant of semi-autonomy as a distinct, aboriginally administered federal territory complicates the regulatory environment in the Canadian Arctic.
mainstream CJS programs do not work for us but Aboriginally administered ones do".
Following the notions of Indigenous media scholar Faye Ginsburg on how aboriginally controlled media production enables cultural activism and transformative action, the book aims to deliver concrete examples of how these media "permit increasing cultural and social agency among indigenous groups, and how aboriginal media producers conceive of traditional knowledge.
A child (who may turn out an idiot) is born by the action of even more complex laws, and I can see no reason why a man, or other animal, may not have been aboriginally produced by other laws, and that all these laws may have been expressly designed by an omniscient Creator, who foresaw every future event and consequence.
Many were aboriginally produced in California then traded to more northerly tribes.
25) However, it need not necessarily follow that for Darwin tribal success was the point of ethics; he argued, in fact, that it was humanity in its specifically primeval state that saw actions as good or bad "solely as they obviously affect the welfare of the tribe," which was why he commented that "this conclusion agrees well with the belief that the so-called moral sense is aboriginally derived from the social instincts, for both relate at first exclusively to the community.
The lightning kills a man, whether a good one or bad one, owing to the excessively complex action of natural laws,--a child (who may turn out an idiot) is born by action of even more complex laws,--and I can see no reason, why a man, or other animal, may not have been aboriginally produced by other laws; & that all these laws may have been expressly designed by an omniscient Creator, who foresaw every future event & consequence.