abreactive


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abreactive

(ˌæbrɪˈæktɪv)
adj
relating to abreaction
References in periodicals archive ?
There is documented evidence to vouch for this approach (9); however, in the course of time, in psychotherapy, hypnotic-suggestion approaches as well as abreactive cathartic methods have fallen into oblivion leaving space to other kind of psychoanalytic approaches based on psychic enquiry, psychosexual development theories and free association technique.
The authors distinguish post-traumatic play segments from abreactive ones, the latter representing a moderate expression of the trauma.
Depending on the sources you consult, the 1890 Ghost Dance movement was an earnest nativist attempt to revitalize local indigenous religious practices with Christian millenialism (Linton 1943; Wallace 1956; Kehoe 1989), an entirely Christian ecstatic movement with only cosmetic traditional trappings (Brown 1970), the first truly pan-Indian political network (Thorton 1986), a cynical "despair cult" which traded on indigenous gullibility to buttress the authority of local shamans (Greenway 1969), or an "abreactive" ritual enactment of cultural dissolution, trauma, and death (Harkin 2004).
That means, for example, interrupting a client whose abreactive expression of emotion is actually sympathetic shock (someone yelling, hitting down, and expressing anger, yet that is not actually dissipating or releasing the festering residue carried from the past into the present).