abrogable

abrogable

(ˈæbrəɡəbəl)
adj
formal able to be abrogated
References in periodicals archive ?
That is, Mill needed to rely on some notion of human nature, in particular the fact of human's perfectibility, in order to defend a principle of liberty that is not merely instrumental for the purpose of promoting utility (and hence abrogable when utility demands it).
Because a "natural law" view of immunity was not widely held by the founding generation, Justice Souter contended that the majority should be restricted to the common law version of sovereign immunity.(317) Such a restriction would, of course, require that the immunity be abrogable by statute.