abscission layer


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abscission layer

n
(Botany) a layer of parenchyma cells that is formed at the bases of fruits, flowers, and leaves before abscission. As the parenchyma disintegrates, the organ becomes separated from the plant
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The other source of grain shattering is abscission layer (Ji, 2006).
Generally, fruit drop is the detachment or separation of a fruit from the pedicel of a branch of tree or a plant, caused by the formation of a abscission layer of cells on the fruit stalk due to a series of physiological and biochemical events.
It is a high yield plant with a complete abscission layer originating from Oryza sativa L.
Clarke and Watson (2002) state that there is an 'abscission layer' at the base of the head, although there seems no reason why dropping the heads is adaptive from the plant's perspective.
The easiness to berries drop from the cluster is associated with the development of the abscission layer (DENG et al., 2007b) between the peduncle and the berry, a process mediated by the abscisic acid, which stimulates the activity of enzymes which degrade the cell wall (ZHANG & ZHANG, 2009).
When the abscission layer was formed at 24 h after ethylene treatment, the distribution of fluorescent labeling presented an even higher level at the abscission zone.
This abscission layer is constructed so as to prevent the tree from "bleeding to death'' when the leaves detach from the tree.
These cells start to divide, forming the bottom part of what's called the abscission layer, the seam where the leaf eventually falls off from.
This connecting part has a special name called the abscission layer. As as there is plenty of sunlight, this part of the leaf remains strong.
These specimens suggest that such relatively short branches were lost by shedding along a definite abscission layer. The Nova Scotia specimen of Bothrodendron punctatum is similar to the second specimen of Lindsey's Bothrodendron minutifolium in having a main axis and a leafy side branch that has a trumpet-shaped base.
Antlers are shed when a thin layer of tissue called the abscission layer disconnects the antler from the pedicle.