absolute magnitude

(redirected from absolute magnitudes)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

absolute magnitude

n.
The intrinsic brightness of a celestial body, measured in magnitudes, computed as if viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs, or 32.6 light years.

absolute magnitude

n
(Astronomy) the apparent magnitude a given star would have if it were situated at a distance of 10 parsecs (32.6 light years) from the earth

ab′solute mag′nitude


n.
the magnitude of a star as it would appear to a hypothetical observer at a distance of 10 parsecs or 32.6 light-years.
[1900–05]

absolute magnitude

A star’s size when seen from a distance of 10 parsecs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.absolute magnitude - (astronomy) the magnitude that a star would have if it were viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs (32.62 light years) from the earthabsolute magnitude - (astronomy) the magnitude that a star would have if it were viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs (32.62 light years) from the earth
magnitude - the property of relative size or extent (whether large or small); "they tried to predict the magnitude of the explosion"; "about the magnitude of a small pea"
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
References in periodicals archive ?
And each cluster contains 50 galaxies within two magnitudes of their dominant members, M87 in Virgo and NGC 3311 in Hydra, both supergiant ellipticals with comparable absolute magnitudes.
The distribution of their absolute magnitudes shows twin peaks, one at -8.
Such estimates can be used to extend the visual light curves, and hence derive more accurate absolute magnitudes, and to derive equivalent parameters for fainter comets.
57 kiloparsecs is used for NGC 6210 then the absolute magnitudes of this object are: -1.
We note that reflection is only detectable for those variables with large absolute magnitudes [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED].
UFO Orbit computed the start and end heights of 16 Q2 Geminid meteors and their absolute magnitudes, captured between Dec 10 and 13 (see Figure 4).
3, more luminous than many core-collapse supernovae, which have absolute magnitudes of about -16.
Such estimates can be used to extend the visual lightcurves, and hence derive more accurate absolute magnitudes.
14, page 89, 1992), former Sky & Telescope "Comet Digest" columnist John Bortle derived the absolute magnitudes of comets C/1963 R1 (Pereyra), C/1965 S1 (Ikeya-Seki), and C/1970 K1 (White-Ortiz-Bolleli) as 5.
Different types of supernovae have different absolute magnitudes and rates of decline from maximum brightness.