absolution


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ab·so·lu·tion

 (ăb′sə-lo͞o′shən)
n.
1. The act of absolving or the state of being absolved.
2. The formal remission of sin imparted by a priest, as in the sacrament of penance.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin absolūtiō, acquittal, from absolūtus, past participle of absolvere, to absolve; see absolute.]

absolution

(ˌæbsəˈluːʃən)
n
1. the act of absolving or the state of being absolved; release from guilt, obligation, or punishment
2. (Roman Catholic Church) Christianity
a. a formal remission of sin pronounced by a priest in the sacrament of penance
b. the prescribed form of words granting such a remission
[C12: from Latin absolūtiōn- acquittal, forgiveness of sins, from absolvere to absolve]
absolutory adj

ab•so•lu•tion

(ˌæb səˈlu ʃən)

n.
1. the act of absolving; the state of being absolved.
2. a remission of sin or of the punishment for sin, esp. as effected by a priest or bishop in the sacrament of penance.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Latin]
ab•sol′u•to`ry (-ˈsɒl yəˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.absolution - the condition of being formally forgiven by a priest in the sacrament of penanceabsolution - the condition of being formally forgiven by a priest in the sacrament of penance
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
2.absolution - the act of absolving or remittingabsolution - the act of absolving or remitting; formal redemption as pronounced by a priest in the sacrament of penance
redemption, salvation - (theology) the act of delivering from sin or saving from evil
indulgence - the remission by the pope of the temporal punishment in purgatory that is still due for sins even after absolution; "in the Middle Ages the unrestricted sale of indulgences by pardoners became a widespread abuse"
penance - a Catholic sacrament; repentance and confession and atonement and absolution

absolution

absolution

noun
The act or an instance of forgiving:
Translations
حَلَّ مِن، غُفْرَان، مَغْفِره
rozhřešení
syndsforladelsetilgivelse
syndafyrirgefning
rozhrešenie

absolution

[ˌæbsəˈluːʃən] N (Rel) → absolución f
to give absolution to sbdar la absolución a algn, absolver a algn

absolution

[ˌæbsəˈluːʃən] n (= forgiveness) → absolution f
to receive absolution → recevoir l'absolution

absolution

n (Eccl) → Absolution f, → Lossprechung f; to say the absolutiondie Absolution erteilen

absolution

[ˌæbsəˈluːʃn] n (Rel) → assoluzione f

absolve

(əbˈzolv) verb
to make free or release (from a promise, duty or blame). He was absolved of all blame.
absolution (ӕbsəˈluːʃən) noun
forgiveness, especially of sins. The priest granted the man absolution.
References in classic literature ?
without confessing his sins, and receiving that absolution which he knew he had one in the house duly authorized to give him?
But," he added in a despairing tone, "perhaps no one will dare to come for it is known that the Spaniards are ranging through the country, and I shall die without absolution.
To the last Lavalle was a Catholic of the old school, accepting--he who had looked into the very heart of the lightnings--the dogmas of papal infallibility, of absolution, of confession--of relics great and small.
About this time I was sent for to the viceroy's camp to confess a criminal, who, though falsely, was believed a Catholic, to whom, after a proper exhortation, I was going to pronounce the form of absolution, when those that waited to execute him told him aloud that if he expected to save his life by professing himself a Catholic, he would find himself deceived, and that he had nothing to do but prepare himself for death.
I have absolution from our holy father, the pope, in my pocket.
and, finishing the prayer of absolution, the priest blessed him and dismissed him.
His free and jovial temper, and the readiness with which he granted absolution from all ordinary delinquencies, rendered him a favourite among the nobility and principal gentry, to several of whom he was allied by birth, being of a distinguished Norman family.
Confess; you know I have the right of giving absolution.
His chamberlain and cardinals came forth, as I remember, to ask whether we would take seven thousand crowns with his blessing and a plenary absolution, or the ten thousand with his solemn ban by bell, book and candle.
When I have been vexed I run out to them for comfort, and when I have been angry without just cause, it is there that I find absolution.
Flaherty was his name and I hope he will die without absolution.
By a species of pious fraud, for which no doubt the worthy priest found his absolution in the purity of his motives, he declared that, while no positive change was actually wrought in the mind of Middleton, there was every reason to hope the entering wedge of argument had been driven to its head, and that in consequence an opening was left, through which, it might rationally be hoped, the blessed seeds of a religious fructification would find their way, especially if the subject was left uninterruptedly to enjoy the advantage of catholic communion.