absorption costing


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Related to absorption costing: marginal costing

absorption costing

n
(Accounting & Book-keeping) a method of cost accounting in which overheads are apportioned to cost centres, where they are absorbed using predetermined rates. Compare marginal costing
References in periodicals archive ?
In respect of the approach to pricing of products based on accounting costs Hilton, Swiergiga and Turner (1988) found that absorption costing was used by an overwhelming majority of American firms.
There have been many approved cost accounting methods--standard costing, total absorption costing, average costing, lean costing, marginal costing, activity-based costing--all of which will result in a wide range of costs per unit that have nothing to do with cash.
Traditional absorption costing is therefore no longer adequate because it just allocates overheads proportionally through arbitrarily chosen allocation bases.
A study conducted by EIDT (2006) among six furniture makers in the western part of Santa Catarina found that four of them used absorption costing exceptionally to value their inventories.
Such a system is characterized by absorption costing. Absorption costing takes its name from the manner?
Costing techniques provide a case in point, with the gradual move from absorption costing to activity-based costing and then to time-based activity costing.
Although the primary costing method used in the enterprise was standard absorption costing, kaizen costing and target costing were also applied.
Absorption costing, on the other hand, records all production costs as inventory first, then moves them to Cost of Goods Sold (COGS) when units are sold.
The primary subject matter of this case concerns income inflation opportunities when GAAP based absorption costing is used as compared to internally used variable costing when more inventory is produced than sold.
Absorption costing and marginal costing systems contrasted.
Traditional absorption costing methods, which are based on proportional allocation of overhead costs according to direct costs consumed by products, are unable to calculate costs relating to capacity changes.
The final section covers traditional managerial accounting topics of classifying costs, job order costing, direct and absorption costing, and standard costing.