abstractly


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Related to abstractly: abstractedly, abstract thought

ab·stract

 (ăb-străkt′, ăb′străkt′)
adj.
1. Considered apart from concrete existence: an abstract concept.
2. Not applied or practical; theoretical.
3. Difficult to understand; abstruse: abstract philosophical problems.
4. Denoting something that is immaterial, conceptual, or nonspecific, as an idea or quality: abstract words like truth and justice.
5. Impersonal, as in attitude or views.
6. Having an intellectual and affective artistic content that depends solely on intrinsic form rather than on narrative content or pictorial representation: abstract painting and sculpture.
n. (ăb′străkt′)
1. A statement summarizing the important points of a text.
2. Something abstract.
3. An abstract of title.
tr.v. (ăb-străkt′) ab·stract·ed, ab·stract·ing, ab·stracts
1.
a. To take away; remove: abstract the most important data from a set of records.
b. To remove without permission; steal: a painting that was abstracted from the museum.
2. To consider (an idea, for example) as separate from particular examples or objects: abstract a principle of arrangement from a series of items.
3. (ăb′străkt′) To write a summary of; summarize: abstract a long article in a paragraph.
4. To create artistic abstractions of (something else, such as a concrete object or another style): "The Bauhaus Functionalists were ... busy unornamenting and abstracting modern architecture, painting and design" (John Barth).
Idiom:
in the abstract
In a way that is conceptual or theoretical, as opposed to actual or empirical.

[Middle English, from Latin abstractus, past participle of abstrahere, to draw away : abs-, ab-, away; see ab-1 + trahere, to draw.]

ab·stract′er n.
ab·stract′ly adv.
ab·stract′ness n.

abstractly

(ˈæbstræktlɪ)
adv
in an abstract manner, theoretically
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.abstractly - in abstract termsabstractly - in abstract terms      
concretely - in concrete terms; "concretely, this meant that he was broke"
Translations

abstractly

[ˈæbstræktli] advd'une manière abstraiteabstract noun nnom m abstrait
References in classic literature ?
Abstractly, theoretically, she did not merely justify, she positively approved of Anna's conduct.
As a general principle, abstractly, Dolly approved of Anna's action; but to see the man for whose sake her action had been taken was disagreeable to her.
To speak less abstractly. In England, for example, no mere parade of costly appurtenances would be so likely as with us, to create an impression of the beautiful in respect to the appurtenances themselves - or of taste as regards the proprietor: - this for the reason, first, that wealth is not, in England, the loftiest object of ambition as constituting a nobility; and secondly, that there, the true nobility of blood, confining itself within the strict limits of legitimate taste, rather avoids than affects that mere costliness in which a parvenu rivalry may at any time be successfully attempted.
When he thought of Ellen Olenska it was abstractly, serenely, as one might think of some imaginary beloved in a book or a picture: she had become the composite vision of all that he had missed.
"I never thought about it so abstractly," he confessed.
Gloriana, the Fairy Queen, is abstractly Glory, but humanly she is Queen Elizabeth; and from other points of view Elizabeth is identified with several of the lesser heroines.
Put thus broadly and abstractly, the answer must be negative.
The Russian government has nothing to do with any interferences [ in the US elections], especially those which were abstractly described [ in the report]|", Peskov pointed out.
The researchers interpreted this effect in light of construal level theory, which proposes that the farther away something is, either physically, emotionally, or socially, the more abstractly we perceive it.
"It's about that specific moment in time when you both get the carpet pulled from underneath you, and everything you've been abstractly dreaming about suddenly becomes a reality.
The topics addressed include "art as history," in which each art object preserves a moment in art's own significant history; the museum as a place of serious study and education; the close historical relationship between calligraphy and painting and their primacy among Chinese fine arts; the parallel development of representational painting and sculpture in early painting history; the greater significance of brushwork, seen abstractly as a means of personal expression by the artist, in later painting history; the paradigmatic importance of the master-to-follower lineage as a social force in shaping the continuity and directing the subtle changes in Chinese painting history.
Students are also provided opportunities to reason abstractly and quantitatively by interpreting data and graphs and using mathematical models to describe typical weather conditions during particular seasons.