abstrusely


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ab·struse

 (ăb-stro͞os′, əb-)
adj.
Difficult to understand; recondite: The students avoided the professor's abstruse lectures.

[Latin abstrūsus, past participle of abstrūdere, to hide : abs-, ab-, away; see ab-1 + trūdere, to push; see treud- in Indo-European roots.]

ab·struse′ly adv.
ab·struse′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.abstrusely - in a manner difficult to understandabstrusely - in a manner difficult to understand; "the professor's abstrusely reasoned theories were wasted on his students"
References in periodicals archive ?
They tended to lose sight of lectio and to become remorselessly subject to abstrusely logical and relendessly rationalistic considerations (22).
The question of what such a world as Blake envisions would look like as we practice, pray, and protest toward it is answered somewhat abstrusely by Freeman in his final chapter, "Postapocalyptic Dissent," as he turns to New World outworkings, first through Roger Williams's clash with Massachusetts Bay Colony and his founding of Providence Colony as a haven of conscience, then more recently through Clarence Jordan's racially diverse experiment with Koinonia Farm and of course Martin Luther King Jr.'s reimagining of a world that embodied Blake's "transformed understanding of Liberty" (170).
According to her, 'Mirror, Mirror' revolves around 16-year-old bandmates Red, Leo, Naima and Rose who are 'all trying to figure out who they are and navigate the minefield of school and relationships.' However, the friends' close bond was put to a test when Naima abstrusely passes away, leaving only a note that says 'Sorry.' While Leo and Rose are busy trying to cope up, Red investigates the possible motives and suspect behind Naima's death until he unravels the dark side of her friend's persona.
The novel brings down the yet centre-stage person in addition to the latter's abstrusely conveyed frequently expressively accused humanism.