shaken baby syndrome

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shaken baby syndrome

also shaken infant syndrome
n.
Brain injury in an infant caused by being violently shaken or tossed, resulting in intracranial swelling and bleeding and subsequent symptoms such as lethargy, seizures, loss of consciousness and often permanent brain damage or death.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

shaken baby syndrome

n
(Pathology) a combination of physical injuries and conditions such as brain damage and broken bones, sometimes leading to death, caused by the vigorous shaking of an infant or young child
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

shak′en ba′by syn`drome


n.
a condition occurring in infants less than one year old, caused by a violent shaking by the arms and shoulders that makes the brain whip back and forth in the skull, causing subdural hematomas and bleeding in the eyes.
[1990–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
They accepted the prosecution's case that Cody's injuries were likely due to an "episode of abusive head trauma involving a shaking mechanism".
District Attorney Jackie Lacey created the unit in 2016 to handle Abusive Head Trauma (AHT) and complex child homicide cases.
It is the prosecution's case that Jones, 26, killed the infant and that Cody's injuries were likely due to an "episode of abusive head trauma involving a shaking mechanism".
On Monday prosecutor Paul Lewis QC told the court a post-mortem examination found Cody's injuries were likely due to an "episode of abusive head trauma involving a shaking mechanism".
In addition to dealing with acute response to child abuse or child maltreatment investigations--sexual abuse, physical abuse, witness to homicide, severe neglect, abusive head trauma cases, failure to thrive, and medical neglect--the clinic provides advocacy and ongoing mental health therapy services.
(10) used Optomap images to show the retinal features of 10 eyes of 5 consecutive infants (aged 1-15 months) with suspected abusive head trauma. It is indisputable that to document and record any abnormalities in patients is a medicolegal obligation.
The researchers note that child abuse can cause injury to any part of the eye, with retinal hemorrhages (RHs) the most common manifestations in infants and young child with abusive head trauma (AHT).
Madam, Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS) also called Abusive Head Trauma or Whiplash Shaken Infant Syndrome as described by Caffey,1 popularly associated with its chief diagnostic triad of subdural haematoma, retinal haemorrhage and encephalopathy can also present with multiple symptoms such as metaphyseal fractures, frontal bossing, rib fractures, scalp injuries and respiratory problems.
(27) Therefore, since 2009, "the [American Academy of Pediatrics] reclassified [SBS] as Abusive Head Trauma to be more inclusive of all the ways a child's head can be injured through abuse, including but not limited to violent shaking." (28) However, in the past, because SBS has been given much attention and discussed as a syndrome that has been under-reported, (29) the forensic experts have diagnosed it to numerous victims, leading to wrongful conviction.
Shaken baby syndrome, abusive head trauma, and actual innocence: getting it right.