academese

academese

language typical of academies or the world of learning; pedantic language.
See also: Language, Language Style
References in periodicals archive ?
Guide" encourages students to find their own voice and to express themselves without jargon or "academese".
Shifting from scholarly to public writing can be difficult for those trained in academese, nor is public writing given much, if any, institutional support.
Also, Pinsker occasionally lapses into academese, such as a reference to a "thirdspace" that is "the interplay between subjectivity and objectivity, the abstract and the concrete, the real and the imagined." I never figured out exactly what that meant.
Although it may be the most efficient way of communicating with scientists in one's field, the formal and intentional use of academese "jargon" (the term often used to describe highly specialized scientific language) may be ineffective with audiences outside the field.
While most commentary is nuanced, enlightening and well-written, it's common to have some of these ideas lost in a labyrinth of verbiage known as "academese".
It is a testament to Wilson's ability that The Greatest Empire does not lapse into academese while exploring topics that might appear to be far from modern concerns.
* Clear, easy-to-read writing in that journal's style and tone, avoiding excessive jargon and "academese."
Moreover, many non-ESL students lack enough fluency in academese to simply intuit the answers to their questions under careful prodding.
The author describes her writing technique as "essayistic," where "thought does not progress in a single direction; instead, the moments are interwoven as in a carpet (Adorno 1991:20)." Indeed, this strategy produces a lively, dynamic and dense text(ure); however, I have found it often necessary to navigate back and forth between pages in order to keep track of some of the more "knotted threads." Also, Herrmans has an excellent command of the Anglophone academese, a complex, often Latinate, English, which haunts (or schongeists) in much of the anthropological literature on ritual (and beyond)--sometimes moving along the narrow path between informative value and aesthetic expression.
At first I thought this was because of a difference in terminology, and if I only worked diligently on translating the academese into everyday English--and believe me I tried--all would be well.
Chinoy's book is written in serviceable prose, but it rarely rises above that, and sometimes descends into loaded or outmoded language ("fellow travelers," "homosexual alliances") and academese.
In the introduction, editors Maggie Parke and Natalie Wilson reveal that they "aimed for a middle-ground between dense academese and frivolity" in the hope that the resulting essays "are entertaining but enlightening, thought-provoking but user-friendly" (p.