academic


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Related to academic: Academic Press, Academic work

ac·a·dem·ic

 (ăk′ə-dĕm′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to institutionalized education and scholarship, especially at a college or university.
b. Of or relating to studies that rely on reading and involve abstract thought rather than being primarily practical or technical.
c. Relating to scholarly performance: a student's academic average.
2. Academic Of or relating to the conservative style of art promoted by an official academy, especially the Académie des Beaux Arts in France in the nineteenth century.
3. Having little practical use or value, as by being overly detailed, unengaging, or theoretical: dismissed the article as a dry, academic exercise.
4. Having no important consequence or relevancy: The debate about who is to blame has become academic because the business has left town.
n.
1. A faculty member or scholar at an institution of higher learning, such as a university.
2. One who has an academic viewpoint or a scholarly background.

ac′a·dem′i·cal·ly adv.

academic

(ˌækəˈdɛmɪk) (ˌækəˈdɛmɪkəl) or

academical

adj
1. (Education) belonging or relating to a place of learning, esp a college, university, or academy
2. of purely theoretical or speculative interest: an academic argument.
3. excessively concerned with intellectual matters and lacking experience of practical affairs
4. (esp of a schoolchild) having an aptitude for study
5. conforming to set rules and traditions; conventional: an academic painter.
6. (Education) relating to studies such as languages, philosophy, and pure science, rather than applied, technical, or professional studies
n
(Education) a member of a college or university
ˌacaˈdemically adv

ac•a•dem•ic

(ˌæk əˈdɛm ɪk)

adj. Also, ac`a•dem′i•cal.
1. of or pertaining to a school, esp. one for higher education.
2. of or pertaining to areas of study that are not primarily vocational or applied, as the humanities or pure mathematics.
3. theoretical or hypothetical; not practical or directly useful: an academic question.
4. learned or scholarly but lacking in worldliness, common sense, or practicality.
5. conforming to set rules, standards, or traditions; conventional: academic painting.
n.
6. a student or teacher at a college or university.
7. a person who is academic in background, attitudes, methods, etc.
8. academics, academic studies or subjects.
[1580–90; < Latin < Greek]
ac`a•dem′i•cal•ly, adv.

academic

A person who is a member of a college, university, or other institution of higher education.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.academic - an educator who works at a college or universityacademic - an educator who works at a college or university
educator, pedagog, pedagogue - someone who educates young people
prof, professor - someone who is a member of the faculty at a college or university
Adj.1.academic - associated with academia or an academyacademic - associated with academia or an academy; "the academic curriculum"; "academic gowns"
2.academic - hypothetical or theoretical and not expected to produce an immediate or practical resultacademic - hypothetical or theoretical and not expected to produce an immediate or practical result; "an academic discussion"; "an academic question"
theoretical - concerned with theories rather than their practical applications; "theoretical physics"
3.academic - marked by a narrow focus on or display of learning especially its trivial aspectsacademic - marked by a narrow focus on or display of learning especially its trivial aspects
scholarly - characteristic of scholars or scholarship; "scholarly pursuits"; "a scholarly treatise"; "a scholarly attitude"

academic

adjective
1. scholastic, school, university, college, educational, campus, collegiate the country's richest and most famous academic institutions
2. scholarly, learned, intellectual, literary, erudite, highbrow, studious, lettered, swotty (Brit. informal) The author has settled for a more academic approach.
3. studious, serious, intellectual, eager, hard-working, scholarly, thoughtful, earnest, reflective, diligent, meditative, bookish, assiduous, swotty (Brit. informal), sedulous The system is failing less academic children.
4. theoretical, ideal, abstract, speculative, hypothetical, impractical, notional, conjectural These arguments are purely academic.
noun
1. scholar, intellectual, don, student, master, professor, fellow, pupil, lecturer, tutor, scholastic, bookworm, man of letters, egghead (informal), savant, academician, bluestocking (usually disparaging), schoolman He is an academic who believes in winning through argument.

academic

adjective
1. Characterized by a narrow concern for book learning and formal rules, without knowledge or experience of practical matters:
2. Concerned primarily with theories rather than practical matters:
Translations
أكَادِيمِيأَكَادِيـمِيّكُلِّيَة، جَامِعه
akademický
akademisk
akateeminenyliopistollinenakateemikko
akademski
egyetemi
háskóla-, fræîilegurháskólakennari
大学の
학원의
akademickývysokoškolský učiteľ
akademski
akademisk
ด้านวิชาการ
mang tính học thuật

academic

[ˌækəˈdemɪk]
A. ADJ
1. (Scol, Univ) [ability, qualifications, achievement] → académico
academic standards were highlos niveles académicos eran buenos
in academic circlesen círculos universitarios
academic freedomlibertad f de cátedra
academic journalrevista f dirigida a académicos
academic staffprofesorado m, personal m docente
the academic worldel mundo académico
2. (= scholarly) → intelectualmente dotado
an exam for academic childrenun examen para niños intelectualmente dotados
3. (= theoretical) [question] → (puramente) teórico, sin interés práctico; [debate] → (puramente) teórico
that's all quite academiceso no tiene ninguna trascendencia
it is of academic interest onlysólo tiene interés teórico
B. Nacadémico/a m/f, profesor(a) m/f universitario/a
C. CPD academic advisor N (US) → jefe mf de estudios
academic dean N (US) → decano/a m/f
academic dress Nvestidura f universitaria
academic gown Ntoga f
academic officers NPL (US) → personal m docente
academic rank N (US) → rango m académico
academic year N (Univ) → año m académico (Scol) → año m escolar

academic

[ˌækəˈdɛmɪk]
adj
(relating to universities) [standard, achievement, research, career, qualifications] → universitaire
academic freedom → liberté f académique
(relating to schools) [standard, achievement, qualifications] → scolaire
(= scholarly) [person] → doué(e) pour les études
(= irrelevant) [issue, question, argument] → théorique
nuniversitaire mfacademic advisor n (US)directeur/trice m/f d'études

academic

adj
akademisch; publisher, reputationwissenschaftlich; academic advisor (US) → Studienberater(in) m(f); academic dean (US) → Dekan(in) m(f); academic officers (US) → akademisches Personal; academic yearakademisches Jahr, Studienjahr nt
(= intellectual) approach, quality, interestwissenschaftlich; interestsgeistig; person, appearanceintellektuell; style, bookakademisch
(= theoretical)akademisch; out of academic interestaus rein akademischem Interesse; since the decision has already been made the discussion is purely academicda die Entscheidung schon getroffen wurde, ist das eine (rein) akademische Diskussion
nAkademiker(in) m(f); (Univ) → Universitätslehrkraft f

academic

[ˌækəˈdɛmɪk]
1. adj
a. (Univ) → accademico/a, universitario/a; (intellectual) → intellettuale
academic life → vita universitaria
academic subjects → materie fpl umanistiche e scientifiche
b. (irrelevant) → puramente formale
that's rather academic now → ormai è un po' superfluo al lato pratico
2. ndocente m/f universitario/a, universitario/a

academy

(əˈkӕdəmi) plural aˈcademies noun
1. a higher school for special study. Academy of Music.
2. a society to encourage science, art etc. The Royal Academy.
3. a type of senior school.
academic (ӕkəˈdemik) adjective
of or concerning study especially in schools, colleges etc. an academic career.
noun
a university or college teacher.
academic ˈyear noun
that part of the year when students go to school, college or university. The academic year ends in June.
acaˈdemically (ӕkəˈde-) adverb

academic

أَكَادِيـمِيّ akademický akademisk akademisch ακαδημαϊκός académico akateeminen scolaire akademski accademico 大学の 학원의 academisch akademisk akademicki académico, acadêmico академический akademisk ด้านวิชาการ akademik mang tính học thuật 学术的
References in classic literature ?
Verily, on soft soles doth it come to me, the dearest of thieves, and stealeth from me my thoughts: stupid do I then stand, like this academic chair.
The early Greek epic -- that is, poetry as a natural and popular, and not (as it became later) an artificial and academic literary form -- passed through the usual three phases, of development, of maturity, and of decline.
TWO YEARS AFTER I left Lincoln, I completed my academic course at Harvard.
His great ability as a phonetician (he was, I think, the best of them all at his job) would have entitled him to high official recognition, and perhaps enabled him to popularize his subject, but for his Satanic contempt for all academic dignitaries and persons in general who thought more of Greek than of phonetics.
He had, as well as the doctor, an academic education; for his father had, with the same paternal authority we have mentioned before, decreed him for holy orders; but as the old gentleman died before he was ordained, he chose the church military, and preferred the king's commission to the bishop's.
I found that during my absence from Hampton the institute each year had been getting closer to the real needs and conditions of our people; that the industrial reaching, as well as that of the academic department, had greatly improved.
His work is like exquisite modern Latin verse, into the academic shape of which, discreet and coy, comes a sincere, deeply felt consciousness of modern life, of the modern world as it is.
I felt that I was wasting my time in the academic examination of machinery.
Yes," said D'Artagnan, "'tis the true guard - the academic guard.
I did not send for you to enter into an academic discussion.
Neither did her courage flag, although it was put to terrific tests when she entered the academic groves of Wareham.
She had lived with her father and sister in a queer old-fashioned, expatriated, artistic Bohemia, in the days when the aesthetic was only the academic and the painters who knew the best models for a contadina and pifferaro wore peaked hats and long hair.

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