acceptable daily intake


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acceptable daily intake

(ADI) A human’s safe daily intake of any chemical, in milligrams per kilogram of body weight.
References in periodicals archive ?
RIIs comparing estimated metal intakes from lip products to the derived acceptable daily intake are presented in Figure 2.
Researchers found that 10 of the lipsticks would expose the wearer to more than double the acceptable daily intake of chromium, if used on a daily basis - although the names of the implicated brands are currently being kept hidden from consumers.
Based on their findings, these researchers at Duke suspect that the acceptable daily intake (ADI) for sucralose in humans may be 500 times lower than the FDA recommendations
The Application of In Vitro in the Derivation of the Acceptable Daily Intake of Food Additives.
Also the acceptable daily intake (ADI) set by the committee of experts of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and World Health Organizations (WHO) of 40mg/kg body weight per day is not exceeded [15].
005 mg/kg/day across the study sites and exceeded the acceptable daily intake limit of 0.
Separately, EFSA has ruled that the maximum acceptable daily intake of confectionery and bakery product colouring Brown HT (E 155) should be halved to 1.
Lu [20] studied that Considering the dietary daily intake of a common man which includes fruit, vegetables, cereals, milk and water, the concentrations of the pesticides intake from these foodstuffs alone could be much higher than the acceptable daily intake.
These figures are used to calculate the acceptable daily intake (ADI) levels for people.
The hormone levels the EU is concerned about are 50 times less than the acceptable daily intake and they represent a tiny fraction of what occurs naturally in an egg or one glass of milk," it declared.
The full evaluations of acceptable daily intake report the results of toxicological studies performed on mice, rats, dogs, and rabbits to test the toxicity of the pesticides.
The FSA advice follows tests which highlight a risk that some young children may exceed the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) at the current permitted level.