accepting

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ac·cept

 (ăk-sĕpt′)
v. ac·cept·ed, ac·cept·ing, ac·cepts
v.tr.
1.
a. To answer affirmatively: accept an invitation.
b. To agree to take (a duty or responsibility).
2. To receive (something offered), especially with gladness or approval: accepted a glass of water; accepted their contract.
3. To admit to a group, organization, or place: accepted me as a new member of the club.
4.
a. To regard as proper, usual, or right: Such customs are widely accepted.
b. To regard as true; believe in: Scientists have accepted the new theory.
c. To understand as having a specific meaning.
5. To endure resignedly or patiently: accept one's fate.
6. To be able to hold (something applied or inserted): This wood will not accept oil paints.
7. To receive officially: accept the committee's report.
8. To consent to pay, as by a signed agreement.
9. To take payment in the form of: a store that does not accept checks.
10. Medicine To receive (a transplanted organ or tissue) without immunological rejection.
v.intr.
To receive something, especially with favor. Often used with of.

[Middle English accepten, from Latin acceptāre, frequentative of accipere, to receive : ad-, ad- + capere, to take; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

ac·cept′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.accepting - tolerating without protestaccepting - tolerating without protest; "always more accepting of coaching suggestion than her teammates"; "the atmosphere was judged to be more supporting and accepting"
acceptive - inclined to accept rather than reject; "she was seldom acceptive of my suggestions"
Translations

accepting

adj to be accepting of something/somebodyfür etw/jdn offen or zugänglich sein; (= tolerant)etw/jdm gegenüber tolerant sein
References in periodicals archive ?
The outcomes described here such as being "in control of" and "compartmentalising" thoughts are perhaps not synonymous with mindfulness, which encourages the ability to relate openly and acceptingly to challenging thoughts (Segal & Williams, 2012; Shapiro & Carlson, 2009).
Acknowledging this role, the practice and profession of policy analysis has evolved, from one explicitly positivistic and rational to one that more critically and acceptingly embraces the relationship between policy analysis and its political contexts and processes.
in this book he studies himself as he has studied others: compassionately, unblinkingly, intelligently, acceptingly and honestly." COLIN MCGINN
"Yeah, you're right," he replies acceptingly. After watching me for a while, he departs.