accompaniment

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ac·com·pa·ni·ment

 (ə-kŭm′pə-nē-mənt, ə-kŭmp′nē-)
n.
1. Music A vocal or instrumental part that supports another, often solo, part.
2. Something, such as a situation, that accompanies something else; a concomitant.
3. Something added for embellishment, completeness, or symmetry; complement.

accompaniment

(əˈkʌmpənɪmənt; əˈkʌmpnɪ-)
n
1. something that accompanies or is served or used with something else
2. something inessential or subsidiary that is added, as for ornament or symmetry
3. (Classical Music) music a subordinate part for an instrument, voices, or an orchestra

ac•com•pa•ni•ment

(əˈkʌm pə nɪ mənt, əˈkʌmp nɪ-)

n.
1. something incidental or added for ornament, symmetry, etc.
2. a musical part supporting and enhancing the principal part.
[1725–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.accompaniment - an event or situation that happens at the same time as or in connection with another
happening, natural event, occurrence, occurrent - an event that happens
associate - any event that usually accompanies or is closely connected with another; "first was the lightning and then its thunderous associate"
background - relatively unimportant or inconspicuous accompanying situation; "when the rain came he could hear the sound of thunder in the background"
2.accompaniment - a musical part (vocal or instrumental) that supports or provides background for other musical partsaccompaniment - a musical part (vocal or instrumental) that supports or provides background for other musical parts
part, voice - the melody carried by a particular voice or instrument in polyphonic music; "he tried to sing the tenor part"
descant, discant - a decorative musical accompaniment (often improvised) added above a basic melody
vamp - an improvised musical accompaniment
3.accompaniment - something added to complete or embellish or make perfect; "a fine wine is a perfect complement to the dinner"; "wild rice was served as an accompaniment to the main dish"
adjunct - something added to another thing but not an essential part of it
4.accompaniment - the act of accompanying someone or something in order to protect themaccompaniment - the act of accompanying someone or something in order to protect them
protection - the activity of protecting someone or something; "the witnesses demanded police protection"
convoy - the act of escorting while in transit

accompaniment

noun
1. backing music, backing, support, obbligato He sang to the musical director's piano accompaniment.
2. supplement, extra, addition, extension, companion, accessory, complement, decoration, frill, adjunct, appendage, adornment The recipe makes a good accompaniment to ice-cream.

accompaniment

noun
1. One that accompanies another:
2. Something added to another for embellishment or completion:
Translations
مُرَافَقَة، مُصَاحَبَه
segona
doprovod
akkompagnement
undirleikur
spremljava
eşlikeşlik eden

accompaniment

[əˈkʌmpənɪmənt] N (also Mus) → acompañamiento m
they marched to the accompaniment of a military banddesfilaban al compás de una banda militar

accompaniment

[əˈkʌmpənɪmənt] n
(musical, sound)accompagnement m
to the accompaniment of [+ cheers, shouting] → au son de
(= food, drink) → accompagnement m

accompaniment

nBegleitung f (also Mus); with piano accompanimentmit Klavierbegleitung; to the accompaniment ofbegleitet von

accompaniment

[əˈkʌmpnɪmənt] n (also) (Mus) → accompagnamento

accompany

(əˈkampəni) verb
1. to go with (someone or something). He accompanied her to the door.
2. to play a musical instrument to go along with (a singer etc). He accompanied her on the piano.
acˈcompaniment noun
something that accompanies. I'll play the piano accompaniment while you sing.
acˈcompanist noun
a person who plays a musical accompaniment.
References in classic literature ?
"I wouldn't have your hair any color but just what it is for the world," said Gilbert, with one or two convincing accompaniments.
Continuing his discourse Don Quixote said: "As we began in the student's case with poverty and its accompaniments, let us see now if the soldier is richer, and we shall find that in poverty itself there is no one poorer; for he is dependent on his miserable pay, which comes late or never, or else on what he can plunder, seriously imperilling his life and conscience; and sometimes his nakedness will be so great that a slashed doublet serves him for uniform and shirt, and in the depth of winter he has to defend himself against the inclemency of the weather in the open field with nothing better than the breath of his mouth, which I need not say, coming from an empty place, must come out cold, contrary to the laws of nature.
The mother played her accompaniments and at the same time watched her daughter with greedy admiration and nervous apprehension.
Starbuck was an honest, upright man; but out of Starbuck's heart, at that instant when he saw the muskets, there strangely evolved an evil thought; but so blent with its neutral or good accompaniments that for the instant he hardly knew it for itself.
The girl who had played the accompaniments sat at the piano and placed a decided foot on the loud pedal.
Thus on the coffin loud and long I strike - the murmur sent Through the grey chambers to my song, Shall be the accompaniment.
There is no order more noisily given or taken up with lustier shouts on board a homeward-bound merchant ship than the command, "Man the windlass!" The rush of expectant men out of the forecastle, the snatching of hand-spikes, the tramp of feet, the clink of the pawls, make a stirring accompaniment to a plaintive up-anchor song with a roaring chorus; and this burst of noisy activity from a whole ship's crew seems like a voiceful awakening of the ship herself, till then, in the picturesque phrase of Dutch seamen, "lying asleep upon her iron."
Down went her head on the little typewriter stand; and the keyboard rattled a dry accompaniment to her moist sobs.
They had race horses, and Russian pancakes and bear hunts and three-horse sledges, and gypsies and drinking feasts, with the Russian accompaniment of broken crockery.
When I put the question to Miles, he played on a minute before answering and then could only say: "Why, my dear, how do I know?"--breaking moreover into a happy laugh which, immediately after, as if it were a vocal accompaniment, he prolonged into incoherent, extravagant song.
During these wanderings, Pierre noticed that he was spoken of now as the "Seeker," now as the "Sufferer," and now as the "Postulant," to the accompaniment of various knockings with mallets and swords.
Never before had I seen houses burning without the accompaniment of an obstructive crowd.