accoucheur


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accoucheur

(akuʃœr)
n
(Gynaecology & Obstetrics) a male obstetrician or midwife
[literally: one who is present at the bedside]

ac•cou•cheur

(ˌæk uˈʃɜr)

n.
a person who assists during childbirth, esp. an obstetrician.
[1750–60; < French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.accoucheur - a physician specializing in obstetricsaccoucheur - a physician specializing in obstetrics
perinatologist - an obstetrician specializing in perinatology
medical specialist, specialist - practices one branch of medicine
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Gambit-- a practitioner just a little lower in status than Wrench or Toller, and especially esteemed as an accoucheur, of whose ability Mr.
He had not indeed great resources of education, and had had to work his own way against a good deal of professional contempt; but he made none the worse accoucheur for calling the breathing apparatus "longs.
As to me, I think my sister must have had some general idea that I was a young offender whom an Accoucheur Policemen had taken up (on my birthday) and delivered over to her, to be dealt with according to the outraged majesty of the law.
When her confinement is due, send to Moscow for an accoucheur.
ACCOUCHEUR A Man who assists women in childbirth B French oral examination C Couch-maker who am I?
La discipline mallarmeenne, par un procede tant soit peu socratique, crea le Symbolisme : Mallarme fut un accoucheur d'esprits.
Birth position, accoucheur, and perineal outcomes: Informing women about choices for vaginal birth, Birth, 29(1), 18-27.
Le Dr Lounes Benghanem, maEtre assistant et accoucheur, a indique que la mere et quatre nouveau-nes se portaient bien alors que le cinquieme presentait une souffrance respiratoire, d'oE la necessite de le placer sous assistance respiratoire meme si sa vie est hors de danger.
Even if it is true, the ease of repair for the accoucheur could be entertained as a reason to perform an episiotomy only if it were definitively shown not to harm the patient in the process.
14 Even more explicitly, this piece presents Farley as 'the principal accoucheur or bringer-forth of the innumerable melo-drames which are yearly produced at the classical Covent Garden Theatre, and the success of which he thus in a double manner promotes, both by his delectable performances before the curtain, and his judicious hints upon the subject of "scenery, machinery, dresses, and decorations," behind it'.
In any clandestine pregnancy plot, the accoucheur is doubtless the key figure, his discretion at least as crucial as his medical expertise.