accretionary


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Related to accretionary: accretionary growth, accretionary prism

ac·cre·tion

 (ə-krē′shən)
n.
1.
a. Growth or increase in size by gradual external addition, fusion, or inclusion.
b. Something contributing to such growth or increase: "the accretions of paint that had buried the door's details like snow" (Christopher Andreae).
2. Biology The growing together or adherence of parts that are normally separate.
3. Geology
a. Slow addition to land by deposition of water-borne sediment.
b. An increase of land along the shores of a body of water, as by alluvial deposit.
4. Astronomy An increase in the mass of a celestial object by its gravitational capture of surrounding interstellar material.

[Latin accrētiō, accrētiōn-, from accrētus, past participle of accrēscere, to grow; see accrue.]

ac·cre′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē), ac·cre′tive adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.accretionary - marked or produced by accretionaccretionary - marked or produced by accretion  
increasing - becoming greater or larger; "increasing prices"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
1), is that 'Sclerochronology is the study of physical and chemical variations in the accretionary hard tissues of organisms, and the temporal context in which they formed.' This definition is not that of Oschmann, but reflects the established practice in the sclerochronology community where this point of view tends to dominate (e.g., Grocke & Gillikin 2008; Andrus 2011; Helmle & Dodge 2011; Schone & Gillikin 2013; Schone & Krause 2016; Steinhardt et al.
These layers, produced by accretionary growth, can be used to estimate the age of P.
According to Aziz et al, (2005), the Rakshani Formation represents accretionary sediments of the Makran Arc-Trench system.
Audzijonyte, Krylova, Sahling, & Vrijenhoek (2012) report the presence on the Costa Rican Pacific Accretionary Wedge of undescribed species of vesicomyid clams of which several were provisionally assigned to the genus Archivesica.
Tectonic units of the Gemericum crystalline basement (Palaeozoic), the Meliaticum accretionary complex (Mesozoic), and the cover nappes of the Turnaicum and Silicicum are present in this region (Mello et al., 1996; Geological map of Slovakia, 2013).
Klaus et al., "New insights into deformation and fluid flow processes in the Nankai Trough accretionary prism: results of Ocean Drilling Program Leg 190," Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, vol.
Bjornsson, "Implosive earthquakes at the active accretionary plate boundary in northern Iceland," Nature, vol.
At ODP Hole 808 (32[degrees]21'N, 134[degrees]57'E; depth = 4675 m) along the Nankai Trough accretionary prism, an averaged silicate concentration of 710 [+ or -] 190[micro]mol/kg, significantly higher than the bottom seawater value of 150 [micro]mol/kg, was detected in porewaters of the surface sediment between 3 and 348m below the seafloor (mbsf).