accusative


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ac·cu·sa·tive

 (ə-kyo͞o′zə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or being the grammatical case that is the direct object of a verb or the object of certain prepositions.
2. Accusatory.
n.
1. The accusative case.
2. A word or form in the accusative case.

[Middle English acusatif, from Old French, from Latin (cāsus) accūsātīvus, (case) of accusation (mistranslation of Greek aitiātikē (ptōsis), causal (case), (case) indicating the thing caused by the verb, from aitiā, cause, also accusation, charge), from accūsātus, past participle of accūsāre, to accuse; see accuse.]

ac·cu′sa·tive·ly adv.

accusative

(əˈkjuːzətɪv)
adj
1. (Grammar) grammar denoting a case of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives in inflected languages that is used to identify the direct object of a finite verb, of certain prepositions, and for certain other purposes. See also objective5
2. (Law) another word for accusatorial
n
(Grammar) grammar
a. the accusative case
b. a word or speech element in the accusative case
[C15: from Latin; in grammar, from the phrase cāsus accūsātīvus accusative case, a mistaken translation of Greek ptōsis aitiatikē the case indicating causation. See accuse]
accusatival adj
acˈcusatively adv

ac•cu•sa•tive

(əˈkyu zə tɪv)

adj.
1. of or designating a grammatical case that indicates the direct object of a verb or the object of certain prepositions.
n.
3. the accusative case.
4. a word or other form in the accusative case.
[1400–50; late Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin accūsātīvus=ac- ac- + -cūsātīvus, comb. form of causātīvus (see causative)]
ac•cu•sa•ti•val (əˌkyu zəˈtaɪ vəl) adj.
ac•cu′sa•tive•ly, adv.

accusative

A grammatical noun case that indicates a direct object of a verb or preposition.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.accusative - the case of nouns serving as the direct object of a verb
oblique, oblique case - any grammatical case other than the nominative
Adj.1.accusative - containing or expressing accusationaccusative - containing or expressing accusation; "an accusitive forefinger"; "black accusatory looks"; "accusive shoes and telltale trousers"- O.Henry; "his accusing glare"
inculpative, inculpatory - causing blame to be imputed to
2.accusative - serving as or indicating the object of a verb or of certain prepositions and used for certain other purposes; "objective case"; "accusative endings"
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
Translations
akuzativčtvrtý pád
akuzativo
akkusatiivisyyttävä
akkuzatívusztárgyeset
ásakaþolfall
galininkas
tožilnik
ackusativ

accusative

[əˈkjuːzətɪv] (Ling)
A. ADJacusativo
B. N (also accusative case) → acusativo m
in the accusativeen acusativo

accusative

[əˈkjuːzətɪv] n (GRAMMAR)accusatif m
in the accusative → à l'accusatif

accusative

nAkkusativ m; in the accusativeim Akkusativ
adjAkkusativ-; accusative caseAkkusativ m; accusative endingAkkusativendung f

accusative

[əˈkjuːztɪv]
1. adj (Gram) → accusativo/a
2. n (Gram) → accusativo
in the accusative → all'accusativo
References in classic literature ?
"Well, he--," said the two, indicating their opponent with accusative forefingers.
However, this rain is not resting, but is doing something ACTIVELY,--it is falling--to interfere with the bird, likely--and this indicates MOVEMENT, which has the effect of sliding it into the Accusative case and changing DEM Regen into DEN Regen." Having completed the grammatical horoscope of this matter, I answer up confidently and state in German that the bird is staying in the blacksmith shop "wegen (on account of) DEN Regen." Then the teacher lets me softly down with the remark that whenever the word "wegen" drops into a sentence, it ALWAYS throws that subject into the GENITIVE case, regardless of consequences--and therefore this bird stayed in the blacksmith shop "wegen DES Regens."
The syntactic and semantic differences between the two sets of forms may be illustrated with the following examples from Romanian, in which te is the unstressed and tine the stressed allomorph of the accusative case of the second person singular pronoun.
This fact becomes even more obvious if we compare this verb with the verb zaliti (to feel sorry for) which opens up a place for an accusative complement.
tua, especially if the accusatives were written compendiously with supralineal abbreviations for the m's.
It occurs in nominative case 8 times, in accusative case 14 times, and in genitive case 40 times.
The Latin preposition in with the accusative (as in civitatem 'into the city') is GOAL + IN.
This seems particularly complex in the context where dative and accusative ko are homophonous.
Alternatively, it has been argued that sithon reflects a weak Old English accusative *s[[i].bar]pan.
Here subject is in nominative case and object is in accusative case and verb is according to the subject.
He said: "It's not being accusative, it's about pointing out the complete collapse in some parts of society of any sense of what's right and wrong."
Former Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith said: "It's not being accusative, it's about pointing out the complete collapse in some parts of society of any sense of what's right and wrong."