accuser


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Related to accuser: completely, gloating, ho hum, overlapping

ac·cuse

(ə-kyo͞oz′)
v. ac·cused, ac·cus·ing, ac·cus·es
v. tr.
1. To charge with a shortcoming or error.
2. To charge formally with a wrongdoing.
v. intr.
To make a charge of wrongdoing against another.

[Middle English acusen, ultimately (party via Old French acuser) from Latin accūsāre : ad-, ad- + causa, lawsuit; see cause.]

ac·cus′er n.
ac·cus′ing·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.accuser - someone who imputes guilt or blameaccuser - someone who imputes guilt or blame  
controversialist, disputant, eristic - a person who disputes; who is good at or enjoys controversy
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

accuser

noun
1. One that accuses:
2. One that makes a formal complaint, especially in court:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
tuduh
accusator

accuser

[əˈkjuːzəʳ] Nacusador(a) m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

accuser

[əˈkjuːzər] naccusateur/trice m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

accuser

nAnkläger(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

accuser

[əˈkjuːzəʳ] naccusatore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"You wander," he said to the Accuser; "it is of little importance how I obtained my power; it is only important how I have used it."
Perhaps he regarded these answers as good enough for his accuser, of whom he makes very light.
Charles listened with marked attention, passing over the insults, noting the grievances, and, when hatred overflowed all bounds and the accuser turned executioner beforehand, replying with a smile of lofty scorn.
"Why, this is Count de Coude, of France." "If I am mistaken," said the accuser, "I shall gladly apologize; but before I do so first let monsieur le count explain the extra cards which I saw him drop into his side pocket."
Bid the chancellor and the sub-chancellor lead in the brothers according to age, together with brother John, the accused, and brother Ambrose, the accuser."
And I myself--do I thereby want to be man's accuser? Ah, mine animals, this only have I learned hitherto, that for man his baddest is necessary for his best,--
It were fairer to confront the accused with the accuser."
And the Woggle-Bug shall be the Public Accuser, because he is so learned that no one can deceive him."
The man and the woman stood face to face - the light badinage which had been passing between them suddenly ended - the man, with his sin stripped bare, mercilessly exposed, the woman, his accuser, passionately eloquent, pouring out her scorn upon a mute victim.
But let us assume that what is called science can harmonize all contradictions and possesses an unchanging standard of good and bad by which to try historic characters and events; let us say that Alexander could have done everything differently; let us say that with guidance from those who blame him and who profess to know the ultimate aim of the movement of humanity, he might have arranged matters according to the program his present accusers would have given him- of nationality, freedom, equality, and progress (these, I think, cover the ground).
Though Mrs Deborah was fully satisfied of the guilt of Jenny, from the reasons above shewn, it is possible Mr Allworthy might have required some stronger evidence to have convicted her; but she saved her accusers any such trouble, by freely confessing the whole fact with which she was charged.
I told him, "that in the kingdom of Tribnia, (3) by the natives called Langdon, (4) where I had sojourned some time in my travels, the bulk of the people consist in a manner wholly of discoverers, witnesses, informers, accusers, prosecutors, evidences, swearers, together with their several subservient and subaltern instruments, all under the colours, the conduct, and the pay of ministers of state, and their deputies.