accuse

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ac·cuse

(ə-kyo͞oz′)
v. ac·cused, ac·cus·ing, ac·cus·es
v. tr.
1. To charge with a shortcoming or error.
2. To charge formally with a wrongdoing.
v. intr.
To make a charge of wrongdoing against another.

[Middle English acusen, ultimately (party via Old French acuser) from Latin accūsāre : ad-, ad- + causa, lawsuit; see cause.]

ac·cus′er n.
ac·cus′ing·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

accuse

(əˈkjuːz)
vb
to charge (a person or persons) with some fault, offence, crime, etc; impute guilt or blame
[C13: via Old French from Latin accūsāre to call to account, from ad- to + causa lawsuit]
acˈcuser n
acˈcusing adj
acˈcusingly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ac•cuse

(əˈkyuz)

v. -cused, -cus•ing. v.t.
1. to charge with the fault, offense, or crime (usu. fol. by of): He was accused of murder.
2. to blame.
v.i.
3. to make an accusation.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French acuser < Latin accūsāre to blame, charge with a crime =ac- ac- + -cūsāre, v. derivative of causa; see cause]
ac•cus′a•ble, adj.
ac•cus′a•bly, adv.
ac•cus′er, n.
ac•cus′ing•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

accuse

charge
1. 'accuse'

If you accuse someone of doing something wrong, you say that they did it.

He accused them of drinking beer while driving.
He is accused of killing ten young women.

Be Careful!
Don't say that you accuse someone 'for' doing something wrong.

2. 'charge'

When the police charge someone with committing a crime, they formally accuse them of it.

He was arrested and charged with committing a variety of offences.
Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012

accuse


Past participle: accused
Gerund: accusing

Imperative
accuse
accuse
Present
I accuse
you accuse
he/she/it accuses
we accuse
you accuse
they accuse
Preterite
I accused
you accused
he/she/it accused
we accused
you accused
they accused
Present Continuous
I am accusing
you are accusing
he/she/it is accusing
we are accusing
you are accusing
they are accusing
Present Perfect
I have accused
you have accused
he/she/it has accused
we have accused
you have accused
they have accused
Past Continuous
I was accusing
you were accusing
he/she/it was accusing
we were accusing
you were accusing
they were accusing
Past Perfect
I had accused
you had accused
he/she/it had accused
we had accused
you had accused
they had accused
Future
I will accuse
you will accuse
he/she/it will accuse
we will accuse
you will accuse
they will accuse
Future Perfect
I will have accused
you will have accused
he/she/it will have accused
we will have accused
you will have accused
they will have accused
Future Continuous
I will be accusing
you will be accusing
he/she/it will be accusing
we will be accusing
you will be accusing
they will be accusing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been accusing
you have been accusing
he/she/it has been accusing
we have been accusing
you have been accusing
they have been accusing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been accusing
you will have been accusing
he/she/it will have been accusing
we will have been accusing
you will have been accusing
they will have been accusing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been accusing
you had been accusing
he/she/it had been accusing
we had been accusing
you had been accusing
they had been accusing
Conditional
I would accuse
you would accuse
he/she/it would accuse
we would accuse
you would accuse
they would accuse
Past Conditional
I would have accused
you would have accused
he/she/it would have accused
we would have accused
you would have accused
they would have accused
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.accuse - bring an accusation against; level a charge against; "The neighbors accused the man of spousal abuse"
reproach, upbraid - express criticism towards; "The president reproached the general for his irresponsible behavior"
accuse, charge - blame for, make a claim of wrongdoing or misbehavior against; "he charged the director with indifference"
arraign - accuse of a wrong or an inadequacy
recriminate - return an accusation against someone or engage in mutual accusations; charge in return
lodge, file, charge - file a formal charge against; "The suspect was charged with murdering his wife"
2.accuse - blame for, make a claim of wrongdoing or misbehavior against; "he charged the director with indifference"
blame, fault - put or pin the blame on
accuse, criminate, incriminate, impeach - bring an accusation against; level a charge against; "The neighbors accused the man of spousal abuse"
asperse, besmirch, calumniate, defame, slander, smirch, denigrate, sully, smear - charge falsely or with malicious intent; attack the good name and reputation of someone; "The journalists have defamed me!" "The article in the paper sullied my reputation"
indict - accuse formally of a crime
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

accuse

verb
1. point a or the finger at, blame for, denounce, attribute to, hold responsible for, impute blame to He accused her of having an affair with another man.
point a or the finger at deny, exonerate
2. charge with, indict for, impeach for, arraign for, cite, tax with, censure with, incriminate for, recriminate for Her assistant was accused of theft and fraud by the police.
charge with vindicate, exonerate, absolve
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

accuse

verb
To make an accusation against:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يَتَّـهِـميَتَّهِمُ
obvinit
beskyldeanklage
syyttää
optužitiokriviti
tuduh
ásaka
訴える
고소하다
accusare
apkaltintikaltinamasiskaltinimaskaltinti
apsūdzēt
obtoženiobtožiti
anklaga
กล่าวหา
buộc tội

accuse

[əˈkjuːz] VT to accuse sb (of)acusar a algn (de)
he stands accused ofse le acusa de ...
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

accuse

[əˈkjuːz] vtaccuser
to accuse sb of sth [+ dishonesty, immorality, murder] → accuser qn de qch
The police are accusing her of murder → La police l'accuse de meurtre.
to accuse sb of doing sth → accuser qn de faire qch, accuser qn d'avoir fait qch
to be accused of sth → être accusé(e) de qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

accuse

vt
(Jur) → anklagen (→ of wegen, +gen); he is or stands accused of murder/thefter ist des Mordes/Diebstahls angeklagt, er steht unter Anklage des Mordes/Diebstahls (form)
personbeschuldigen, bezichtigen; to accuse somebody of doing or having done somethingjdn beschuldigen or bezichtigen, etw getan zu haben; are you accusing me? I didn’t take it!beschuldigen Sie mich? Ich habe es nicht genommen; are you accusing me of lying/not having checked the brakes?willst du (damit) vielleicht sagen, dass ich lüge/die Bremsen nicht nachgesehen habe?; to accuse somebody of being untidyjdm vorwerfen, unordentlich zu sein; who are you accusing, the police or society?wen klagen Sie an, die Polizei oder die Gesellschaft?; I accuse the government of dishonestyich werfe der Regierung Unehrlichkeit vor; a generation stands accused of hypocrisyeine Generation wird der Scheinheiligkeit beschuldigt or angeklagt or geziehen (geh); we all stand accuseduns alle trifft eine Schuld
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

accuse

[əˈkjuːz] vt to accuse sb (of)accusare qn (di)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

accuse

(əˈkjuːz) verb
(with of) to charge (someone) with having done something wrong. They accused him of stealing the car.
ˌaccuˈsation (ӕ-) noun
the accused
the person(s) accused in a court of law. The accused was found not guilty.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

accuse

يَتَّهِمُ obvinit beskylde beschuldigen κατηγορώ acusar syyttää accuser optužiti accusare 訴える 고소하다 beschuldigen beskylde oskarżyć acusar обвинять anklaga กล่าวหา suçlamak buộc tội 指控
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

accuse

v. acusar, denunciar, culpar.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
Then he proceeds to divide his accusers into two classes; first, there is the nameless accuser--public opinion.
Such accusers of life--them life overcometh with a glance of the eye.
But let us assume that what is called science can harmonize all contradictions and possesses an unchanging standard of good and bad by which to try historic characters and events; let us say that Alexander could have done everything differently; let us say that with guidance from those who blame him and who profess to know the ultimate aim of the movement of humanity, he might have arranged matters according to the program his present accusers would have given him- of nationality, freedom, equality, and progress (these, I think, cover the ground).
Though Mrs Deborah was fully satisfied of the guilt of Jenny, from the reasons above shewn, it is possible Mr Allworthy might have required some stronger evidence to have convicted her; but she saved her accusers any such trouble, by freely confessing the whole fact with which she was charged.
I told him, "that in the kingdom of Tribnia, (3) by the natives called Langdon, (4) where I had sojourned some time in my travels, the bulk of the people consist in a manner wholly of discoverers, witnesses, informers, accusers, prosecutors, evidences, swearers, together with their several subservient and subaltern instruments, all under the colours, the conduct, and the pay of ministers of state, and their deputies.
What other body would be likely to feel CONFIDENCE ENOUGH IN ITS OWN SITUATION, to preserve, unawed and uninfluenced, the necessary impartiality between an INDIVIDUAL accused, and the REPRESENTATIVES OF THE PEOPLE, HIS ACCUSERS?
"The boldest thing that the accusers did," continued Grandfather, "was to cry out against the governor's own beloved wife.
"You wander," he said to the Accuser; "it is of little importance how I obtained my power; it is only important how I have used it."
Charles listened with marked attention, passing over the insults, noting the grievances, and, when hatred overflowed all bounds and the accuser turned executioner beforehand, replying with a smile of lofty scorn.
"Why, this is Count de Coude, of France." "If I am mistaken," said the accuser, "I shall gladly apologize; but before I do so first let monsieur le count explain the extra cards which I saw him drop into his side pocket."
Bid the chancellor and the sub-chancellor lead in the brothers according to age, together with brother John, the accused, and brother Ambrose, the accuser."
It were fairer to confront the accused with the accuser."