acequia


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a·ce·qui·a

 (ə-sā′kē-ə)
n. Southwestern US
An irrigation canal.

[Spanish, from Arabic as-sāqiya : al-, the + sāqiya, irrigation ditch, feminine active participle of saqā, to give to drink; see šqy in Semitic roots.]

acequia

(əˈseɪkjə; əˈseɪkɪə)
n
a ditch for irrigation

a•ce•qui•a

(əˈseɪ ki ə)

n., pl. -qui•as. Southwestern U.S.
an irrigation ditch.
[1835–45, Amer.; < Sp < Arabic al-sāqiyah the irrigation ditch]
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract notice: project of building a raft to supply intermediate high of real acequia de escalona (valencia) works.
NEW YORK, July 7, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Doppler Labs today announced the close of a $17 million Series B investment round led by The Chernin Group, David Bonderman's Wildcat Capital Management and Acequia Capital.
George Ancona spent a year photographing the school garden at Acequia Madre Elementary School near his home in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Among the topics are Pueblo watersheds, Navajo water rights and the Black Mesa struggle, politics of the Colorado River with Stewart Udall, the watershed and the sense of place in the Merced and Acequia landscape, the quest for a sustainable food culture, and navigating the rapids of the future.
In a state frequently ravaged by drought, the acequia system operates a under repartimiento (water sharing) system in proportion to what the various groups of people in the system need.
For seventy-three years they also lived in the Spanish Territorial Revival house they designed and built in New Mexico at the edge of Santa Fe's Acequia Madre ("main ditch"), affectionately called the "house of the three wise women" by their friend the California journalist and preservationist Charles Fletcher Lummis.
Juan the Bear and the Water of Life / La Acequia de Juan del Oso is a bilingual English/Spanish children's picturebook of folklore about how the waterways, rivers, and irrigation ditches that carry water from tributaries of the Rio Grande to the watershed of the Mora, Canadian, Arkansas, and Mississippi rivers came to be.
A community-operated irrigation canal, or acequia, threads its way from the riverbanks where the crows chatter into a neighborhood of low adobe abodes.
Especially picturesque: the side streets off Acequia Madre, such as Camino Manzano and San Antonio Street.
seI) CE acequia (a canal for irrigation), fiance SA sacred, dispensation SAI saint, sailor SE Seder (Passover service), Luiseno (a Shoshone Indian people) shimose (a high explosive), seance SI sind (to rinse), Sinaic SSAY essay(ette) SSEH medresseh (a Muslim college) SZAI szaibelyite (a hydrous borate of magnesium) CEE fiancee SAE saeter (a meadow associated with a dwelling) SAY saying, calisaya (a valuable Peruvian bark), soothsay SEI seigniorial, seine (a fishing net), abseil, nisei \sayyid SEY Seychelles, causey (a dam) SSA decussate, glissade, cessation SSE masse (a billiards term), chausse (shod) SSEI nissei (an American born of Japanese parents) ZE piazze (var.
Acequia Sylvia Rodriguez SAR Press PO Box 2188, Santa Fe, NM 87504-2188 9781930618558, $27.
The long trough is the baptismal font, if "font" isn't too feeble a word for an acequia, the desert irrigation ditch of a thousand years of Pueblo Indian peoples and four hundred years of Hispanic farmers in this valley.