acerbity

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a·cer·bi·ty

 (ə-sûr′bĭ-tē)
n. pl. a·cer·bi·ties
Sourness or acidness of taste, character, or tone.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

acerbity

(əˈsɜːbɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. vitriolic or embittered speech, temper, etc
2. sourness or bitterness of taste
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acerbity - a sharp bitterness
bitter, bitterness - the property of having a harsh unpleasant taste
2.acerbity - a sharp sour tasteacerbity - a sharp sour taste      
acidity, sourness, sour - the property of being acidic
3.acerbity - a rough and bitter manneracerbity - a rough and bitter manner    
disagreeableness - an ill-tempered and offensive disposition
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

acerbity

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
BitterkeitSauerkeit

acerbity

[əˈsɜːbɪtɪ] N
1. [of taste] → acritud f, aspereza f
2. (fig) → mordacidad f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

acerbity

[əˈsɜːrbɪti] n [humour, wit] → aigreur f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

acerbity

nSchärfe f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
my dear fellow beings, why should we longer cherish any social acerbities, or know the slightest ill-humor or envy!
My dear fellow beings, why should we longer cherish any social acerbities, or know the slightest ill-humor or envy!
I felt divinely free from all ill-will, or petulance, or malice of any sort whatsoever." As he finds himself unwittingly squeezing his co-laborers' hands, "an abounding, affectionate, friendly, loving feeling did this avocation beget." At this point Ishmael launches into a panegyric in honor of universal peace and brotherhood: "My dear fellow beings, why should we longer cherish any social acerbities, or know the slightest ill-humor or envy!