acetaldehyde


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ac·et·al·de·hyde

 (ăs′ĭ-tăl′də-hīd′)
n.
A colorless, flammable liquid, C2H4O, used to manufacture acetic acid, perfumes, and drugs.

acetaldehyde

(ˌæsɪˈtældɪˌhaɪd)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a colourless volatile pungent liquid, miscible with water, used in the manufacture of organic compounds and as a solvent and reducing agent. Formula: CH3CHO. Systematic name: ethanal

ac•et•al•de•hyde

(ˌæs ɪˈtæl dəˌhaɪd)

n.
a volatile, colorless liquid, C2H4O, used esp. in organic synthesis.
[1875–80]

ac·et·al·de·hyde

(ăs′ĭ-tăl′də-hīd′)
A colorless, flammable liquid, C2H4O, used to make acetic acid, perfumes, and drugs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acetaldehyde - a colorless volatile water-soluble liquid aldehyde used chiefly in the manufacture of acetic acid and perfumes and drugsacetaldehyde - a colorless volatile water-soluble liquid aldehyde used chiefly in the manufacture of acetic acid and perfumes and drugs
aldehyde - any of a class of highly reactive chemical compounds; used in making resins and dyes and organic acids
Translations
Acetaldehyd
acétaldéhydeéthanal
acetaldehyd
etanal
References in periodicals archive ?
In a previous study, the occurrence of carbonyl compounds (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, furfural and EC) was reported in all stages of vinification, including grapes and the respective wines (FERREIRA et al., 2018).
If you drink slowly and in moderation, the liver can process the equivalent of one drink (0.5 ounces of alcohol) an hour without building up toxic levels of acetaldehyde in the blood.
For the wood-only panel, HPLC of the hydrazine-reacted fraction revealed acetaldehyde (ca.
The goals of this study were to determine: (1) if there are differences in the content of alcohol and acetaldehyde in 2 natural Drosophila species habitats, (2) whether there are differences in the effect of ethanol on mortality of D.
The treatments with ethanol and the following production of acetaldehyde may affect the cellular structure, promote the degradation of the cell wall and affect the taste (Chung et al., 2015).
As alcohol is broken down in the gut, bacteria convert it into large quantities of acetaldehyde, a chemical that has previously been shown to cause cancer in animals.
Our body needs to break down acetaldehyde into simpler chain compounds to prevent its build-up.
They found that acetaldehyde can break and damage DNA within blood stem cells leading to rearranged chromosomes and permanently altering the DNA sequences within these cells.
Acetaldehyde, resulting from ethanol oxidation, is a reactive and highly toxic by-product that contributes to tissue damage, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and an imbalance in the redox potential (NAD/NADH).
Technology company Celanese Corporation (NYSE:CE) stated on Friday that it will increase the list and off-list selling prices for acetaldehyde in Europe with effect from 1 April 2017, or as contracts otherwise allow.