acetous


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Related to acetous: Acetous acid

a·ce·tous

 (ə-sē′təs, ăs′ĭ-təs)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or producing acetic acid or vinegar.
2. Having an acetic taste; sour-tasting.

[Middle English, sour, from Medieval Latin acētōsus, vinegary, from Latin acētum, vinegar; see acetum.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

acetous

(ˈæsɪtəs; əˈsiː-) or

acetose

adj
1. (Chemistry) containing, producing, or resembling acetic acid or vinegar
2. tasting like vinegar
[C18: from Late Latin acētōsus vinegary, from acētum vinegar]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ac•e•tous

(ˈæs ɪ təs, əˈsi-)

also ac•e•tose

(-ˌtoʊs, -toʊs)

adj.
1. containing or producing acetic acid.
2. sour; producing or resembling vinegar; vinegary.
[1770–80; < Late Latin acetōsus. See acetum, -ous]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.acetous - tasting or smelling like vinegar
sour - having a sharp biting taste
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

acetous

adjective
Having a taste characteristic of that produced by acids:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
'[Vinegar] is produced from raw materials of different agricultural origin containing starch and sugars, that are subjected to a process of double fermentation, alcoholic, and acetous,' said the book, Fermented Foods in Health and Disease Prevention.
Domingo said that, although synthetic acetic acid may not be harmful to human health, vinegar products should have undergone the "natural process of alcoholic or acetous fermentation of natural raw materials" as in accordance with the agency's standard.
The beverage of this time was much closer to what one would consider hard cider today: "the vinous liquor produced by fermentation of the juice of apples, before acetous or vinegar fermentation has succeeded," as described by J.M.