achromatic


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Related to achromatic: Achromatic colors

ach·ro·mat·ic

 (ăk′rə-măt′ĭk, ā′krə-)
adj.
1. Designating color perceived to have zero saturation and therefore no hue, such as neutral grays, white, or black.
2. Refracting light without spectral color separation.
3. Biology Difficult to stain with standard dyes. Used in reference to cells or tissues.
4. Music Having only the diatonic tones of the scale.

[From Greek akhrōmatos : a-, without; see a-1 + khrōma, khrōmat-, color.]

ach′ro·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
a·chro′ma·tic′i·ty (-tĭs′ĭ-tē) n.
a·chro′ma·tism (ā-krō′mə-tĭz′əm) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

achromatic

(ˌækrəˈmætɪk)
adj
1. without colour
2. (General Physics) capable of reflecting or refracting light without chromatic aberration
3. (Biology) cytology
a. not staining with standard dyes
b. of or relating to achromatin
4. (Classical Music) music
a. involving no sharps or flats
b. another word for diatonic
5. (Medicine) denoting a person who is an achromat
ˌachroˈmatically adv
achromatism, achromaticity n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ach•ro•mat•ic

(ˌæk rəˈmæt ɪk, ˌeɪ krə-)

adj.
1. free from color; lacking hue.
2. able to emit, transmit, or receive light without separating it into colors.
3. (of a cell structure) difficult to stain.
4. without accidentals in musical key.
[1760–70]
ach`ro•mat′i•cal•ly, adv.
a•chro•ma•tism (eɪˈkroʊ məˌtɪz əm) a•chro`ma•tic′i•ty (-ˈtɪs ə ti) n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.achromatic - having no hue; "neutral colors like black or white"
colorless, colourless - weak in color; not colorful
chromatic - being or having or characterized by hue
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

achromatic

[ˌækrəʊˈmætɪk] ADJacromático
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ach·ro·mat·ic

a. acromático-a, sin color.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
The air, afflicted to pallor with the hoary multitudes that infested it, twisted and spun them eccentrically, suggesting an achromatic chaos of things.
Chromatic aberrations in Fresnel lenses working as photovoltaic (PV) primary optics concentrators are an important limit in order to obtain high concentration ratios [2], leading to new optical solutions for the primary concentration system as aplanatic lens [7], low dispersion glasses, and achromatic doublets [8].
Take a look at the way the bark's corky ridges create crisp areas of light and shadow evocative of those sharp, achromatic photographs of the lunar landscape.
A large aperture achromatic doublet like the instrument employed by Greenacre and Barr is remarkably ill-suited for assessing any 'delicate' colour phenomena.
Achromatic colors such as silver, black, gray, and white still dominate automotive markets in North and South America and Europe.
Bladelike and biomorphic in character, the shapes suggest breasts or lips while conjuring an achromatic pastoral metaphor.
HORIBA Scientific's UVISEL 2 combines a fully automated platform that includes a patented vision system, eight computer-selectable, achromatic spot sizes, and fast scanning, high-resolution monochromators, making it a suited solution for efficient and rapid thin film characterization over a spectral range of 190 to 2100 nm.
In order to evaluate the effect of color contrast on the visibility of objects in night-time driving conditions, three colored targets (that is, blue, green and red) and an achromatic target were employed.
is used to working with small parts, but its latest iteration of submillimeter achromatic lenses takes tiny to the extreme.
Instead the latest trend is to swathe yourself in the pure innocence of this achromatic colour.
An achromatic eyepiece provides users a crisp image covering the entire field of view.
Standard achromatic perimetry and optic nerve head topography by Heidelberg retina tomography (HRT) II were studied at baseline and thereafter every 6 months.