achromat

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Related to achromats: Achromatic doublet

achromat

(ˈækrəˌmæt)
n
1. (General Physics) Also called: achromatic lens a lens designed to bring light of two chosen wavelengths to the same focal point, thus reducing chromatic aberration. Compare apochromat
2. (Medicine) a person who has no colour vision at all and can distinguish only black, white, and grey. The condition is very rare
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The price for high-quality refractors has fallen dramatically in recent years, and you can now purchase a 4-to-5-inch extra-low dispersion (ED) apochromatic (APO) telescope that's almost entirely free of the false color that plagues achromats for a fraction of the cost commonly seen a decade ago.
In point of fact, there may well be phenomenal differences between, e.g., achromats and normally sighted people.
Lower-powered microscope objectives can be of moderate quality, such as achromats, as lower magnifications are typically used.
The sun blinds people with achromatopsia, known as achromats, when they are outside, and some people are so sensitive to light that they are even uncomfortable indoors in a normally lit room.
Lenses are similar in performance to the company's TECHSPEC Aspherized Achromats, yet they offer several advantages.
Like all fast achromats, the Infinity 90 shows violet halos around the Moon and planets, but the planetary views are otherwise quite attractive and detailed.
Achromats, the most inexpensive models, produce a bluish-purple halo of unfocused light around bright subjects such as the Moon and planets.
Company specializes in custom manufacturing of precision lenses, prisms, achromats, windows, mirrors, and filters.
DayStar recommends using achromats or apochomatic refractors without additional correcting elements near the focuser.
* Inexpensive refractors (ones called achromats) are unable to focus all colors to the same point, which results in a halo of blue light around bright objects.
These include a pair of D&G Optical 5-inch f/30 achromats in oversized tubes that are intended primarily for solar observing.
That $20 telescope fired her imagination, just as many other lowly 50-mm achromats have done for others (I still fondly remember my first 50-mm Tasco).