acoustician

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ac·ous·ti·cian

 (ăk′o͞o-stĭsh′ən)
n.
A specialist in acoustics.

acoustician

(ˌækʊˈstɪʃən)
n
(General Physics) an expert in acoustics

ac•ous•ti•cian

(ˌæk ʊˈstɪʃ ən)

n.
an acoustic engineer.
[1875–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acoustician - a physicist who specializes in acoustics
physicist - a scientist trained in physics
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References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: In Switzerland, architects and acousticians are dedicated to creating urban environments that sound as good as they look
WAVES aims at fostering scientific and technological advances in this context, stimulating knowledge exchange between seismologists and acousticians, and researchers in the public/private domains.
com)-- Ensuring room acoustics meet the latest ISO 16283-1:2014 standard is much easier for architects, developers and acousticians with Bruel & Kjaer's Qualifier[TM] Type 7830 software.
Leo Beranek, one of the most influential acousticians of our time, describes a concert hall having "warmth" when the bass frequencies are clearly audible.
The report is from the Independent Noise Working Group (INWG) which claims the wind industry and its acousticians have "for many years been denying there are noise-related problems associated with industrial wind turbines.
Since then, increasingly sophisticated technology allows acousticians to record natural soundscapes with far more breadth and depth.
To tune them, trained acousticians machine away layers of metal, judging by ear when the bell produces the desired sound.
A company of acousticians called Artec had already physically modelled the expected sound patterns in e Meyerson Symphony Center, an equally revered hall which opened in Dallas in 1989.
The Symphony Hall story has links with the development of The Meyerson Symphony Center, an equally revered hall in Dallas as they were both designed by a company of acousticians called Artec.
Room acousticians design performance halls such that low frequencies that "crawl" around the walls get redistributed to the listener.
Stanford University Libraries has provided digital access to large portions of the Musical Acoustics Research Library (MARL), making available important research papers from some of the most eminent acousticians of the 20th century (http://www.