acquiescence


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ac·qui·es·cence

 (ăk′wē-ĕs′əns)
n.
1. Passive assent or agreement without protest.
2. The state of being acquiescent.

ac•qui•es•cence

(ˌæk wiˈɛs əns)

n.
1. the act or condition of acquiescing.
2. Law. failure to take legal proceedings, thereby implying the abandonment of a right.
[1625–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acquiescence - acceptance without protestacquiescence - acceptance without protest    
acceptance - the state of being acceptable and accepted; "torn jeans received no acceptance at the country club"
2.acquiescence - agreement with a statement or proposal to do somethingacquiescence - agreement with a statement or proposal to do something; "he gave his assent eagerly"; "a murmur of acquiescence from the assembly"
agreement - the verbal act of agreeing
acceptance - (contract law) words signifying consent to the terms of an offer (thereby creating a contract)
conceding, concession, yielding - the act of conceding or yielding

acquiescence

acquiescence

noun
1. The act or process of accepting:
Informal: OK.
2. The quality or state of willingly carrying out the wishes of others:
Translations
مُوَافَقَة، قُبُول ضِمْنِي
souhlas
føjelighedindvilligelse
hallgatólagos beleegyezés
òegjandi samòykki
razı olma

acquiescence

[ˌækwɪˈesns] Naquiescencia f (in a, en) → consentimiento m (in para)

acquiescence

[ˌækwiˈɛsəns] nassentiment m
acquiescence in sth → assentiment à qch
acquiescence to sth → consentement m à qch

acquiescence

nEinwilligung f (→ in in +acc); (submissive) → Fügung f (→ in in +acc); with an air of acquiescencemit zustimmender Miene

acquiescence

[ˌækwɪˈɛsns] n (frm) → acquiescenza, consenso

acquiesce

(ӕkwiˈes) verb
to agree. After a lot of persuasion, he finally acquiesced.
acquiˈescence noun
acquiˈescent adjective
References in classic literature ?
acquiescence in whatever fate may send me--a cheerful acquiescence.
Ford, with an expression on his mobile features of mediate and happy acquiescence, started to reach for his pocket, then turned suddenly to Mr.
At length all these jarring matters were adjusted, if not to the satisfaction, at least to the acquiescence of all parties.
I nodded comprehension of his statement, and acquiescence in it, as a man should nod who knows all about men.
This acquiescence in Mrs Blifil was considered by the neighbours, and by the family, as a mark of her condescension to her brother's humour, and she was imagined by all others, as well as Thwackum and Square, to hate the foundling in her heart; nay, the more civility she showed him, the more they conceived she detested him, and the surer schemes she was laying for his ruin: for as they thought it her interest to hate him, it was very difficult for her to persuade them she did not.
Now there was left with him, at least, a philosophic acquiescence to the existing order--only a desire to be permitted to exist, with now and then a little whiff of genuine life, such as he was breathing now.
The house, too, as described by Sir John, was on so simple a scale, and the rent so uncommonly moderate, as to leave her no right of objection on either point; and, therefore, though it was not a plan which brought any charm to her fancy, though it was a removal from the vicinity of Norland beyond her wishes, she made no attempt to dissuade her mother from sending a letter of acquiescence.
Defarge looked gloomily at his wife, and gave no other answer than a gruff sound of acquiescence.
Poor old fellow, he had not uttered one word of surprise, complaint, fear, or even acquiescence from the very beginning of our troubles till now, when we had laid him down in the log-house to die.
The smallness of the army renders the natural strength of the community an overmatch for it; and the citizens, not habituated to look up to the military power for protection, or to submit to its oppressions, neither love nor fear the soldiery; they view them with a spirit of jealous acquiescence in a necessary evil, and stand ready to resist a power which they suppose may be exerted to the prejudice of their rights.
Elizabeth was exceedingly pleased with this proposal, and felt persuaded of her sister's ready acquiescence.
The secretary drooped his head with an expression of perfect acquiescence in anything that had been said or might be; and Lord George gradually sinking down upon his pillow, fell asleep.