acquirement


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ac·quire·ment

 (ə-kwīr′mənt)
n.
1. The act of acquiring.
2. An attainment, such as a skill or social accomplishment.

ac•quire•ment

(əˈkwaɪər mənt)

n.
1. the act of acquiring, esp. the gaining of knowledge or mental attributes.
2. Often, acquirements. something that is acquired, esp. an acquired ability or attainment.
[1620–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acquirement - an ability that has been acquired by trainingacquirement - an ability that has been acquired by training
ability, power - possession of the qualities (especially mental qualities) required to do something or get something done; "danger heightened his powers of discrimination"
craftsmanship, workmanship, craft - skill in an occupation or trade
horsemanship - skill in handling and riding horses
literacy - the ability to read and write
marksmanship - skill in shooting
mastership - the skill of a master
mixology - skill in preparing mixed drinks
numeracy - skill with numbers and mathematics
oarsmanship - skill as an oarsman
salesmanship - skill in selling; skill in persuading people to buy; "he read a book on salesmanship but it didn't help"
seamanship - skill in sailing
showmanship - the ability to present something (especially theatrical shows) in an attractive manner
soldiering, soldiership - skills that are required for the life of soldier
swordsmanship - skill in fencing

acquirement

noun
Something completed or attained successfully:
Translations

acquirement

[əˈkwaɪəmənt] N
1. [of possessions] → adquisición f, obtención f
2. acquirements (frm) (= skills) → conocimientos mpl

acquirement

n
(act) = acquisition a
(= skill etc acquired)Fertigkeit f
References in classic literature ?
But Cyrus' acquirement of the chunk of hair was his last triumph.
When the decision was arrived at by the Gun Club, to the disparagement of Texas, every one in America, where reading is a universal acquirement, set to work to study the geography of Florida.
When he at last became a free man again, he said he believed he would hunt up a brisker seat of learning; the Heidelberg lectures might be good, but the opportunities of attending them were too rare, the educational process too slow; he said he had come to Europe with the idea that the acquirement of an education was only a matter of time, but if he had averaged the Heidelberg system correctly, it was rather a matter of eternity.
He was much surprised and pleased with this new acquirement which had been so suddenly thrust upon him, but he had no time for thinking much upon it.
That he was taking his life in his hands he well knew, but so great was the man's cupidity that he reckoned no risk too great for the acquirement of a fortune.
When in the Convent, my progress had always exceeded my instructions, my Acquirements had been wonderfull for my age, and I had shortly surpassed my Masters.
I do not mean, therefore, that Frederica's acquirements should be more than superficial, and I flatter myself that she will not remain long enough at school to understand anything thoroughly.
The grandest field that ever was; and all my own; not a competitor; not a man who wasn't a baby to me in acquirements and capacities; whereas, what would I amount to in the twentieth century?
He was rapidly rising in acquirements and virtues, when, in an evil hour, his stable was newly painted.
Goddard was the mistress of a Schoolnot of a seminary, or an establishment, or any thing which professed, in long sentences of refined nonsense, to combine liberal acquirements with elegant morality, upon new principles and new systemsand where young ladies for enormous pay might be screwed out of health and into vanitybut a real, honest, oldfashioned Boardingschool, where a reasonable quantity of accomplishments were sold at a reasonable price, and where girls might be sent to be out of the way, and scramble themselves into a little education, without any danger of coming back prodigies.
A branch of knowledge which belongs to the acquirements of a federal representative, and which has not been mentioned is that of foreign affairs.
Perhaps his mother had a reasonable distrust of the practice of Dr Todd, who must then have been in the novitiate of his experimental acquirements.