acrasia


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acrasia

(əˈkreɪzɪə)
n
a lack of self discipline, by which a person acts contrary to usual judgment
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Their debut album, Acrasia, is out today, a beautiful and incredibly engaging creation, the perfect showcase for Ruairi Friel's unforgettable vocals.
(64) See David Charles, "NE VII.3: Varieties of Acrasia," in Aristotle: The Nicomachean Ethics, Book VII Symposium Aristotelicum, 9-39.
Apesar de a Etica a Nicomaco ser a obra em que Aristoteles melhor descreve a tipologia dos caracteres, a palavra ethos aparece apenas em quatro lugares: em Il44b4, onde cada um dos ethe esta presente em todo ser humano, por natureza, enquanto potencia, ou seja, todos sao capazes de desenvolver qualquer dos caracteres, podendo deste modo cultivar a virtude; em 1l45al6, onde ha tres tipos de ethos a serem evitados, que sao a perversao, a acrasia e a bestialidade; e em 1l64a12, em que o ethos e indicado como fundamento da amizade mais duradoura.
Stadium; Vitality The Fish; Acrasia; WHEN: WHERE WH| WHO
The first chapter explores how luxury is represented as a fluid and evolving concept within Spenser's The Faerie Queene, specifically with Acrasia and the bower of bliss episode in book two.
Una de las cuestiones particulares que estudia es la acrasia, relacionandola con las desviaciones de la razon practica.
(29) However, unlike Verdant in the Bower of Bliss, to whom Spenser restores a name after Guyon and the Palmer have separated him from Acrasia, despite the fact that his "braue shield, full of old moniments" had been "fowly ra'st, that none the signes might see" (II.xii.80.3-4), Timias never recovers this aspect of his textual identity.
Anne's and the Garden of Adonis stand in parallel contradistinction to Belbury and Acrasia's Bower of Bliss.
Mortdant is already dead, and the dying Amavia tells the story of how, when she was pregnant, he went off on his quest and was seduced by Acrasia, the evil seductive witch.
1590-96), (55) where seductresses such as Acrasia coax knights to sin by lulling them into sleep, resulting in an effacement of proper chivalric identity.
In the first chapter, Sullivan examines the second book of The Faerie Queene, finding in Verdant, the seduced knight caught in Acrasia's web of delight, a sleeping figure in whom is evident the merger of plant and animal that is the human.
(II.ii.3.6-9) Guyon begins to read the image as a sign of guilt, but he does not know if the baby has inherited this mark through the supernatural intervention of God or through the natural consequences of his parents' folly in drinking from the cup of the witch Acrasia: (19)