actinium


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ac·tin·i·um

 (ăk-tĭn′ē-əm)
n. Symbol Ac
A radioactive element found in uranium ores, used in equilibrium with its decay products as a source of alpha rays. Its longest lived isotope is Ac-227 with a half-life of 21.77 years. Atomic number 89; melting point 1,050°C; boiling point 3,198°C; specific gravity (calculated) 10.07; valence 3. See Periodic Table.

[From Greek aktīs, aktīn-, ray (from its radioactivity); see nekw-t- in Indo-European roots.]

actinium

(ækˈtɪnɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a radioactive element of the actinide series, occurring as a decay product of uranium. It is used as an alpha-particle source and in neutron production. Symbol: Ac; atomic no: 89; half-life of most stable isotope,227Ac: 21.6 years; relative density: 10.07; melting pt: 1051°C; boiling pt: 3200 ± 300°C
[C19: New Latin, from actino- + -ium]

ac•tin•i•um

(ækˈtɪn i əm)

n.
a radioactive, silver-white, metallic element that glows blue in the dark, resembling the rare earths in chemical behavior and valence. Symbol: Ac; at. no.: 89; at. wt.: 227.
[< French (1900); see actino-, -ium2]

ac·tin·i·um

(ăk-tĭn′ē-əm)
Symbol Ac A silvery-white, highly radioactive metallic element of the actinide series that is found in uranium ores. It is about 150 times more radioactive than radium and is used as a source of alpha rays. Its most stable isotope has a half-life of about 22 years. Atomic number 89. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.actinium - a radioactive element of the actinide seriesactinium - a radioactive element of the actinide series; found in uranium ores
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
uranium ore - any ore from which uranium can be extracted
Translations
актиний
actinium
actinium
aktiinium
aktinium
aktinij
aktínium
aktín
アクチニウム
actinium
aktinis
actinium
aktyn
actiniu
aktinij
aktinium
aktinyum

actinium

[ækˈtɪnɪəm] Nactinio m
References in periodicals archive ?
27 December 2012 - US biopharmaceutical firm Actinium Pharmaceuticals Inc said it had closed the first tranche, worth USD5.1m (EUR3.8m), of its current common stock offering.
Dr Almaula joins Actinium with significant experience in the targeted radiotherapy field, having most recently worked as head, Business Development at Advanced Accelerator Applications Inc.
Schaffer offers the example of metal actinium, whose isotope 225Ac has demonstrated the potential to kill cancerous tumours, although it would need to be employed in combination with biochemical agents that could prevent it from accumulating in other parts of the body.
Alphabetically, actinium is the first in the list of what?
To increase drug potency lintuzumab was conjugated to radionuclides as, for example, actinium ([sup.225]Ac), bismuth ([sup.231]Bi), or iodine (I-131), with promising results in AML patients [105-107].
Thorium is radioactive element decayed very slowly compared to many other radioactive materials (half-life of [sup.223]Th is 1.405 x [10.sup.10] year) to produces a radioactive gas, radon-220, radium and actinium and emits alpha particles which can be breathed in and swallowed.
Properties of four natural decay series of actinides [2] Series Initial Half-life, Stable nuclide years endmember Thorium [sup.232]Th 1.405 x [10.sup.10] [sup.208]Pb Neptunium [sup.237]Np 2.140 x [10.sup.6] [sup.209]Bi Uranium [sup.238]U 4.470 x [10.sup.9] [sup.206]Pb Actinium [sup.235]U 7.038 x [10.sup.8] [sup.207]Pb Table 2.
27 December 2012 a[euro]" US biopharmaceutical firm Actinium Pharmaceuticals Inc said it had closed the first tranche, worth USD5.1m (EUR3.8m), of its current common stock offering.
A fast reactor's ability to fission all actinides (actinium and heavier elements), makes it theoretically possible to repeatedly separate those materials from spent fuel and feed them back into the reactor until they are entirely fissioned.
For instance, Actinium has the oxidation order +3, while Uranium --only +3, +4, +5, and +6.
About 55% of this quantity is from gamma rays emitted by terrestrial radon; 8% is from cosmic ray; the natural radioactivity of environmental rocks (composed of such radionuclides as uranium, actinium, radium and thorium) and the absorbed dose from internal sources (Klement et al.