euthanasia

(redirected from active euthanasia)
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Related to active euthanasia: passive euthanasia

eu·tha·na·sia

 (yo͞o′thə-nā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
The act or practice of ending the life of a person or animal having a terminal illness or a medical condition that causes suffering perceived as incompatible with an acceptable quality of life, as by lethal injection or the suspension of certain medical treatments.

[Greek euthanasiā, a good death : eu-, eu- + thanatos, death.]

euthanasia

(ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə) or

euthanasy

n
(Medicine) the act of killing someone painlessly, esp to relieve suffering from an incurable illness. Also called: mercy killing
[C17: via New Latin from Greek: easy death, from eu- + thanatos death]

eu•tha•na•sia

(ˌyu θəˈneɪ ʒə, -ʒi ə, -zi ə)

n.
Also called mercy killing. the act of putting to death painlessly or allowing to die, as by withholding medical measures from a person or animal suffering from an incurable, esp. a painful, disease or condition.
[1640–50; < New Latin < Greek euthanasía easy death]

euthanasia

1. the act of putting to death without pain a person incurably ill or suffering great pain; mercy killing.
2. an easy, painless death. — euthanasic, adj.
See also: Killing
the deliberate killing of painfully ill or terminally ill people to put them out of their misery. Also called mercy killing.
See also: Death
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.euthanasia - the act of killing someone painlessly (especially someone suffering from an incurable illness)euthanasia - the act of killing someone painlessly (especially someone suffering from an incurable illness)
kill, putting to death, killing - the act of terminating a life

euthanasia

noun mercy killing, assisted suicide the emotive question of whether euthanasia should be legalized
Translations
إماتَه رَحيمَه
eutanasimedlidenhedsdrab
eutanázia
líknardráp
eutanazijaneskausmingas numarinimas
eitanāzija
eutanázia
ötenazitatlı ölüm

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə] Neutanasia f

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪziə] neuthanasie f

euthanasia

nEuthanasie f

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə] neutanasia

euthanasia

(juːθəˈneiziə) noun
the painless killing of someone who is suffering from a painful and incurable illness. Many old people would prefer euthanasia to the suffering they have to endure.

eu·tha·na·si·a

n. eutanasia, muerte infringida sin sufrimiento en casos de una enfermedad incurable.

euthanasia

n eutanasia
References in periodicals archive ?
Seemingly not content with having become the world's first jurisdiction to legalize physician assistance in suicide, Oregon has now decided to try the course of involuntary active euthanasia by a nurse, as illustrated by the recent case of Dr.
Recognition of the distinction between refusals and requests is an important reason for preferring patient refusal of food and fluids to voluntary active euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide as a method for determining the timing of one's death.
Although Judge Rothstein claims to limit her decision to aiding terminally ill patients commit suicide, certainly those persons who need active euthanasia (because, for example, a physical impediment precludes their taking the final step toward death) could rely on the judge's reasoning to show that a legal system that allows active steps to aid suicide but not active euthanasia does not treat them equally.
So, when Brock discusses active euthanasia, the wrongness of killing is understood in terms of the right not to be killed.
Whereas the modern medical establishment has tended to identify death as the absolute evil and to define the doctor as an unconditional fighter against death, proponents of active euthanasia see suffering as the supreme evil.
The change he proposes is to support legalization of physician-assisted suicide but not active euthanasia.
According to Dan Brock, who supports both physician-assisted suicide and voluntary active euthanasia, the fact "that suicide or attempted suicide is no longer a criminal offense in virtually all states indicates an acceptance of individual self-determination in the taking of one's own life analogous to that required for voluntary active euthanasia.
Had this initiative passed, the state would have been the first in the world since the Nazi era formally to permit physicians to perform active euthanasia.
This Life Cycle thus offers a strong challenge to the forces pushing active euthanasia and assisted suicide.
All the then-disputed death and dying topics are addressed: definitions of death and the "brain death" controversy, the emerging debate on non-treatment of children born with disabilities, the early controversy on withholding and withdrawing treatment, and the basics on active euthanasia.
Those who defend physician-assisted suicide often seek to distinguish it from active euthanasia, but in fact, the two acts face the same objections.
In the course of Parts I and II an important defense of some cases of active euthanasia is developed.