sensitization

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sen·si·tize

 (sĕn′sĭ-tīz′)
v. sen·si·tized, sen·si·tiz·ing, sen·si·tiz·es
v.tr.
1. To make sensitive: "Solitude had sensitized him to the roughness of other people" (Jeffrey Eugenides).
2. To make (a film or plate) sensitive to light, especially to light of a specific wavelength.
3. To make hypersensitive or reactive to an antigen, such as pollen, especially by a second or repeated exposure.
v.intr.
To become sensitive or hypersensitive.


sen′si·ti·za′tion (-tĭ-zā′shən) n.
sen′si·tiz′er n.

sen•si•ti•za•tion

(ˌsɛn sɪ təˈzeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the process of becoming susceptible to a given stimulus that previously had no effect or significance.
2. a state or condition in which a previously encountered foreign substance triggers an immune reaction.
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sensitization - the state of being sensitive (as to an antigen)
irritation - (pathology) abnormal sensitivity to stimulation; "any food produced irritation of the stomach"
predisposition, sensitivity - susceptibility to a pathogen
2.sensitization - (psychology) the process of becoming highly sensitive to specific events or situations (especially emotional events or situations)
physical process, process - a sustained phenomenon or one marked by gradual changes through a series of states; "events now in process"; "the process of calcification begins later for boys than for girls"
psychological science, psychology - the science of mental life
3.sensitization - rendering an organism sensitive to a serum by a series of injections
immunisation, immunization - the act of making immune (especially by inoculation)
Translations

sen·si·ti·za·tion

n. sensibilización, acto de hacer sensible o sensorial.
References in periodicals archive ?
These molecules also can induce active sensitization.
Based on the theoretical requirements discussed above three different experimental strategies can be followed to establish the pathogenic role of NMO antibodies, the transfer of disease and lesions by AQP-4 antibodies or human NMO serum alone, the transfer of NMO serum into animals with T-cell-mediated brain inflammation and the disease induction by active sensitization of susceptible animals with AQP-4.
When T-cell lines are not available, inflammation can also be induced by active sensitization with an encephalitogenic peptide; however, the more pronounced variability of EAE in an active model may mask additional effects, induced by antibodies, in particular when they are subtle.

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