actorly

actorly

(ˈæktəlɪ)
adj
of, relating to, or characteristic of an actor
References in periodicals archive ?
Shakespeare has a lot to answer for - he had Richard III stitched up - and I want to unpick some of these stitches, to reconsider the historical impact of a the hellish 'bottled spider', and to have some fun with actorly depiction, deconstructing Richard with a female comedic performer, with a disability perspective.
The conflicts of interest driven by personal attachments are even closer to the heart of "The Post," and it helps that there's a real actorly balance at work here.
On a fall afternoon at a sidewalk cafe in Texas, he orders shrimp fajitas but apologetically skips the tortillas thanks to a semi-strict regimen for an upcoming role, perhaps the most actorly thing about him.
Grant is marvellous, never overdoing the pantomime villainy, seething with actorly vanity as he shares his evil plans with a roomful of mannequins done up as Hamlet, Macbeth, etc.
Her name was Annelise (there's a fine actorly name for you).
Mark Ruffalo ("Foxcatcher"), as an Olympic medalist victimized by one man's delusion of grandeur, toned down his actorly mannerisms and physically transformed himself into a believable wrestling champ.
That "inner life" so rapidly became the metric of actorly evaluation says much about the role of the commercial theater review in indoctrinating actors, audiences, and--in a self-fulfilling loop--other reviewers in a language of inferiority, a language so familiar to us that we might fail to register how recent, pervasive, and remarkable it is.
In later life, after the startling, random horror of losing his daughter and granddaughter in the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami, he gave perhaps the best description of actorly focus there has been.
A lazier, more ickily mawkish load of old tosh I've yet to see, the lowest point being where Derek's "favouritest" dog Ivor had to be put down - an unbearably manipulative scene which solely seemed to exist as a showcase for Gervais' actorly emoting.
Fans of Cage and Cusack, previously paired as unlikely allies in Con Air (1997), may be looking forward to a bit of deranged actorly combat once Hansen is cornered in the interrogation room, but it's here that this hopeless flick comes up especially short.
Man gets up, meets up with his mates, gets fantastically DRUNK, gets into fight, trashes hotel, WAKEs up, somehow manages to perform his actorly duties and the whole sequence starts over and over again.
When you're playing those initial interviews with characters and you don't know what the truth is, you can't load those scenes with actorly tricks – you have to play it for what it is, which can only make it more real.