actuality


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ac·tu·al·i·ty

 (ăk′cho͞o-ăl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. ac·tu·al·i·ties
1. The state or fact of being actual; reality. See Synonyms at existence.
2. often actualities Actual conditions or facts.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

actuality

(ˌæktʃʊˈælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. true existence; reality
2. (sometimes plural) a fact or condition that is real
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ac•tu•al•i•ty

(ˌæk tʃuˈæl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. actual existence; reality.
2. an actual condition or circumstance; fact.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.actuality - the state of actually existing objectively; "a hope that progressed from possibility to actuality"
being, beingness, existence - the state or fact of existing; "a point of view gradually coming into being"; "laws in existence for centuries"
entelechy - (Aristotle) the state of something that is fully realized; actuality as opposed to potentiality
genuineness - the state of being genuine
realness, realism, reality - the state of being actual or real; "the reality of his situation slowly dawned on him"
reality - the state of the world as it really is rather than as you might want it to be; "businessmen have to face harsh realities"
the true, trueness, verity, truth - conformity to reality or actuality; "they debated the truth of the proposition"; "the situation brought home to us the blunt truth of the military threat"; "he was famous for the truth of his portraits"; "he turned to religion in his search for eternal verities"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

actuality

noun
1. reality, truth, substance, verity, materiality, realness, substantiality, factuality, corporeality It exists in dreams rather than actuality.
2. fact, truth, reality, verity You may theorise, but we are concerned with actualities.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

actuality

noun
1. The fact or state of existing or of being actual:
2. Something having real, demonstrable existence:
3. The quality of being actual or factual:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
حَقِيقَة، حَالِيَّة
realitaskutečnost
virkelighed
raunveruleiki

actuality

[ˌæktjʊˈælɪtɪ] Nrealidad f
in actualityen realidad
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

actuality

[ˌæktʃuˈælɪti] n
in actuality (= actually, in reality) → en réalité
(= reality) → réalité f
(formal) (= fact) → fait m (= condition) → situation f réelle
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

actuality

n (= reality)Wirklichkeit f, → Realität f; (= realism)Aktualität f; the actualities of the situationdie tatsächlichen Gegebenheiten
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

actuality

[ˌæktʃʊˈælɪtɪ] n but in actuality ...ma in realtà...
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

actual

(ˈӕktʃuəl) adjective
real; existing; not imaginary. In actual fact he is not as stupid as you think he is.
ˌactuˈality (-ˈӕ-) noun
(a) reality. the actuality of the situation.
ˈactually adverb
1. really. She actually saw the accident happen.
2. in fact. Actually, I'm doing something else this evening.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Its distinguishing principle, probability, corresponds to the literal actuality of the photograph and puts it distinctly into the category of reporting; whereas the free wing of the romancer enables him to mount to such altitudes of imagination as he may be fitted to attain; and the first three essentials of the literary art are imagination, imagination and imagination.
Yet the uninteresting lives of men so entirely given to the actuality of the bare existence have their mysterious side.
A glance at a geological map will show that whatever truth there may have been of the actuality of such monsters in the early geologic periods, at least there was plenty of possibility.
Perforce, because he was born in our horde he stayed with us; but in actuality he was an atavism and his place was elsewhere.
The coarse brawl, the loathsome den, the crude violence of disordered life, the very vileness of thief and outcast, were more vivid, in their intense actuality of impression, than all the gracious shapes of art, the dreamy shadows of song.
Where before it had been an actuality to her she now realized that Korak was but a memory.
The world was at least ignorant of its bereavement, while to me it was a real and terrible actuality.
It must have been at about the same instant that Achmet Zek discovered the pile of yellow ingots and realized the actuality of what he had already feared since first his eyes had alighted upon the party beside the ruins of the Englishman's bungalow.
But, like all oft-repeated truths, it has in time lost something of its actuality and cogency.
But if you did have that other reason up your sleeve, if you didn't want to know me, if--if, well, if you thought my feelings oughtn't to be hurt just because you had a good job with me..." Here, his calm consideration of a possibility was swamped by the fear that it was an actuality, and he lost the thread of his reasoning.
The lines 22-3 are therefore a very early piece of tradition about Hesiod, and though the appearance of Muses must be treated as a graceful fiction, we find that a writer, later than the "Works and Days" by perhaps no more than three-quarters of a century, believed in the actuality of Hesiod and in his life as a farmer or shepherd.
The actuality! Here I lay, bound hand and foot, doubtless almost upon the very site of a part of ancient London, yet all about me was a primeval wilderness, and I was a captive of half-naked wild men.