actuary

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ac·tu·ar·y

 (ăk′cho͞o-ĕr′ē)
n. pl. ac·tu·ar·ies
A statistician who computes insurance risks and premiums.

[Latin āctuārius, secretary of accounts, from ācta, records, from neuter pl. past participle of agere, to drive, do; see ag- in Indo-European roots.]

ac′tu·ar′i·al (-âr′ē-əl) adj.
ac′tu·ar′i·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

actuary

(ˈæktʃʊərɪ)
n, pl -aries
(Professions) a person qualified to calculate commercial risks and probabilities involving uncertain future events, esp in such contexts as life assurance
[C16: (meaning: registrar): from Latin āctuārius one who keeps accounts, from actum public business, and acta documents, deeds. See act, -ary]
actuarial adj
actuarially adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ac•tu•ary

(ˈæk tʃuˌɛr i)

n., pl. -ar•ies.
1. a person who computes insurance premium rates, dividends, risks, etc., based on statistical data.
2. Archaic. a registrar or clerk.
[1545–55; < Latin āctuārius shorthand writer, clerk]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

actuary

a statistician of an insurance company who calculates risks and premiums.
See also: Finance
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.actuary - someone versed in the collection and interpretation of numerical data (especially someone who uses statistics to calculate insurance premiums)actuary - someone versed in the collection and interpretation of numerical data (especially someone who uses statistics to calculate insurance premiums)
statistics - a branch of applied mathematics concerned with the collection and interpretation of quantitative data and the use of probability theory to estimate population parameters
calculator, estimator, figurer, reckoner, computer - an expert at calculation (or at operating calculating machines)
surveyor - someone who conducts a statistical survey
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
aktuar

actuary

[ˈæktjʊərɪ] Nactuario/a m/f de seguros
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

actuary

[ˈæktʃuəri] nactuaire mf
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

actuary

n (Insur) → Aktuar(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

actuary

[ˈæktjʊərɪ] nattuario/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Actuarially required contributions and a recovering stock market will continue to reduce pension plan liabilities significantly.
(12) Note that regardless of whether the individual is an expected utility maximizer or not, the average per capita consumption will be W - [pi] L under an actuarially fair premium.
1.72-9, Table V), meaning that she is actuarially expected to live another 20 years.
Homeowners who refused mitigation would have been subject to actuarially derived higher rates and would have been ineligible for federal disaster assistance following a flood.
"If we can obtain quantifiable data on a particular exposure, such as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's data regarding nuclear plant shutdowns, and can combine that exposure with a pure insurance risk that has been analyzed actuarially, we can put together a cost-effective risk transfer solution" says Doug Oliver, vice-president of financial engineering at AIG Risk Finance, a New York-based insurer of several dual-trigger programs.
In contrast to private pension plans, which are normally set up on an actuarially sound basis, Roosevelt's Social Security was pay-as-you-go, with current retirees' benefits paid out of current workers' taxes.
It is well known that a risk averse individual, who purchases actuarially fair insurance, will choose full coverage and exercise optimal care.
* Actuarially estimating the obligation and expense under accrual accounting.
The changes reduced Citizens indicated rate need - the increase necessary for Citizens rates to become actuarially sound - by 19 percent.
On an aggregate basis, the city funds its pensions at or above actuarially determined levels.