ad loc.

ad loc.

abbr. Latin
ad locum (to, or at, the place)
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Press, 1980-1983), ad loc. The different recensions of the Targum are characterized in vol.
Anderson (1997, ad loc.) points out that the adjective Saturnius "reminds us ironically of Jupiter's unfilial treatment of his father." There may be more to it than simple irony, however; it may prefigure certain aspects of the Lycaon story as developed later in this paper.
Books VI 25-32 and VII, Groningen 1981, 52 ad loc., sulla scia di H.
4:17-24 and commentary of Artscroll, Genesis, Brooklyn, N.Y.:Mesorah Publications, 1995, ad loc.
See his commentary to Deuteronomy, ad loc. In this context, he also gives one of the clearest statements applying biblical law to the question of the preservation of biodiversity.
82 See the excellent edition of Poliziano's Lamia by Wesseling in Poliziano, 1986, xxv-xxviii; see also the discussions in the commentary to 4, 26-37, ad loc. Agli's treatment is not mentioned there: it is contained in MS Naples BN VIII.
Mastronarde in his commentary ad loc. observes that `there is certainly an intertextual allusion' to Aeschylus' S.
The idea that Aufidius condemns Coriolanus for deluding himself comes from the words 'power, unto itself most commendable', which Parker glosses (ad loc.) as 'power, which thinks itself praiseworthy'.