ad rem


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Related to ad rem: ad hominem

ad rem

 (ăd rĕm)
adj.
Relevant; pertinent.
adv.
To the point; relevantly.

[Latin : ad, to + rem, accusative of rēs, matter, thing.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ad rem

(æd ˈrɛm)
adj, adv
to the point; without digression: to reply ad rem; an ad rem discussion. Compare ad hominem
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ad rem

(æd ˈrɛm, ɑd)
adj.
1. relevant; pertinent: an ad rem argument.
adv.
2. without digressing.
[< Latin: literally, to the matter]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ad rem impugnatami Congregationis decretum diei 13 Martii 2001 in parte motiva animadvertit agi de violatione can.
The GWN automobiles will be sold in Latvia by Subaru dealers, Partner Motors and Ad rem auto.
For an unusual effect combine orange Ad Rem with blush pink peony-flowered Angelique tulips, or the ruffled red parrot tulip, Rococo; violet Attila with rose coloured Don Quichotte, or two tone red Ile de France with purest white, Pax.
But in doing so, Doig signals something about the confines of Aristotle's actual philosophical doctrines and intentions (and does not this qualify as ad rem contemporary exegesis?) that Aquinas chose to bypass.
Substantial sections are not truly ad rem. It may, however, outlast the first two as a monument to the council, since it deals brilliantly with the controverted genesis of the document widely recognized as the council's major contribution to the 20th-century reform of the Catholic Church, namely, the Constitution on the Church.
In this sense, for all its excellence, his essay is not entirely ad rem in this book.
As for Alcuin's lengthy and learned arguments against Elipandus and Felix, they were, according to Dr Cavadini, in large part not ad rem. Alcuin did not deliberately distort, but his cultural milieu was different and he did not share the Spaniards' approach to the question.