adage

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Related to Adages: Proverbs, Idioms

adage

traditional saying; proverb: An old adage states that you reap what you sow.
Not to be confused with:
axiom – self-evident truth; universally accepted principle or rule: “As sure as day follows night” is an axiom.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

ad·age

 (ăd′ĭj)
n.
A saying that sets forth a general truth and that has gained credit through long use. See Synonyms at saying. See Usage Note at redundancy.

[French, from Old French, from Latin adagium.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

adage

(ˈædɪdʒ)
n
a traditional saying that is accepted by many as true or partially true; proverb
[C16: via Old French from Latin adagium; related to āio I say]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ad•age

(ˈæd ɪdʒ)

n.
a traditional saying expressing a common experience or observation; proverb.
[1540–50; < French < Latin adagium=ad- ad- + ag-, s. of āio I say + -ium -ium1]
a•da•gi•al (əˈdeɪ dʒi əl) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

adage

a maxim, axiom, proverb, or old saying.
See also: Proverbs, Wisdom
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adage - a condensed but memorable saying embodying some important fact of experience that is taken as true by many people
locution, saying, expression - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

adage

noun saying, motto, maxim, proverb, dictum, precept, by-word, saw, axiom, aphorism, apophthegm The old adage 'Every baby brings its own love' usually turns out true.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

adage

noun
A usually pithy and familiar statement expressing an observation or principle generally accepted as wise or true:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
sanonta

adage

[ˈædɪdʒ] Nadagio m, refrán m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

adage

[ˈædɪdʒ] (old-fashioned) n (= maxim, saying) → adage m
the adage that ... → l'adage selon lequel ...
the old adage that ... → le vieil adage selon lequel ...ad agency nagence f de publicité
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

adage

nSprichwort nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

adage

[ˈædɪdʒ] n (old) → adagio, detto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
But manifestly to our Priests and Women this adage did not apply.
That experience is the parent of wisdom, is an adage the truth of which is recognized by the wisest as well as the simplest of mankind.
This he had, however, neglected; as it was usual with him to do all manner of disorders which did not confine him to his bed, or prevent his several faculties from performing their ordinary functions;--a conduct which we would by no means be thought to approve or recommend to imitation; for surely the gentlemen of the Aesculapian art are in the right in advising, that the moment the disease has entered at one door, the physician should be introduced at the other: what else is meant by that old adage,
The Latin adage meeteth with it a little: Magna civitas, magna solitudo; because in a great town friends are scattered; so that there is not that fellowship, for the most part, which is in less neighborhoods.
There must always be two parties to a quarrel, says the old adage. Mr.
The citizens of Delphi were visited with a series of calamities, until they made a public reparation of their crime; and, "The blood of Aesop" became a well-known adage, bearing witness to the truth that deeds of wrong would not pass unpunished.
'Sophronia, darling, Mr and Mrs Boffin will remind you of the old adage, that self-praise is no recommendation.'
Miss Trotwood, or Miss Betsey, as my poor mother always called her, when she sufficiently overcame her dread of this formidable personage to mention her at all (which was seldom), had been married to a husband younger than herself, who was very handsome, except in the sense of the homely adage,'handsome is, that handsome does' - for he was strongly suspected of having beaten Miss Betsey, and even of having once, on a disputed question of supplies, made some hasty but determined arrangements to throw her out of a two pair of stairs' window.
Pickwick; and the best, as everybody knows, on the infallible authority of the old adage, could do no more.
A curious friendship theirs must have been: a pointed illustration, indeed, of the old adage that "extremes meet."
In truth, those who desired, according to the old adage, to sell anything valuable for a song, might find customers all over the Fair; and there were innumerable messes of pottage, piping hot, for such as chose to buy them with their birthrights.
It bristled there - somewhere near at hand, however unseen still - as the hunted thing, even as the trodden worm of the adage must at last bristle; and Brydon at this instant tasted probably of a sensation more complex than had ever before found itself consistent with sanity.