adduce


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Related to adduce: adduce evidence

ad·duce

 (ə-do͞os′, ə-dyo͞os′)
tr.v. ad·duced, ad·duc·ing, ad·duc·es
To cite as an example or means of proof in an argument.

[Latin addūcere, to bring to : ad-, ad- + dūcere, to lead; see deuk- in Indo-European roots.]

ad·duce′a·ble, ad·duc′i·ble adj.

adduce

(əˈdjuːs)
vb
(tr) to cite (reasons, examples, etc) as evidence or proof
[C15: from Latin addūcere to lead or bring to]
adˈducent adj
adˈducible, adˈduceable adj
adduction n

ad•duce

(əˈdus, əˈdyus)

v.t. -duced, -duc•ing.
to bring forward, as in evidence.
[1610–20; < Latin addūcere to bring into =ad- ad- + dūcere to lead]
ad•duc′i•ble, adj.
ad•duc′er, n.

adduce

- To cite as an instance or as proof or evidence.
See also related terms for proof.

adduce


Past participle: adduced
Gerund: adducing

Imperative
adduce
adduce
Present
I adduce
you adduce
he/she/it adduces
we adduce
you adduce
they adduce
Preterite
I adduced
you adduced
he/she/it adduced
we adduced
you adduced
they adduced
Present Continuous
I am adducing
you are adducing
he/she/it is adducing
we are adducing
you are adducing
they are adducing
Present Perfect
I have adduced
you have adduced
he/she/it has adduced
we have adduced
you have adduced
they have adduced
Past Continuous
I was adducing
you were adducing
he/she/it was adducing
we were adducing
you were adducing
they were adducing
Past Perfect
I had adduced
you had adduced
he/she/it had adduced
we had adduced
you had adduced
they had adduced
Future
I will adduce
you will adduce
he/she/it will adduce
we will adduce
you will adduce
they will adduce
Future Perfect
I will have adduced
you will have adduced
he/she/it will have adduced
we will have adduced
you will have adduced
they will have adduced
Future Continuous
I will be adducing
you will be adducing
he/she/it will be adducing
we will be adducing
you will be adducing
they will be adducing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been adducing
you have been adducing
he/she/it has been adducing
we have been adducing
you have been adducing
they have been adducing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been adducing
you will have been adducing
he/she/it will have been adducing
we will have been adducing
you will have been adducing
they will have been adducing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been adducing
you had been adducing
he/she/it had been adducing
we had been adducing
you had been adducing
they had been adducing
Conditional
I would adduce
you would adduce
he/she/it would adduce
we would adduce
you would adduce
they would adduce
Past Conditional
I would have adduced
you would have adduced
he/she/it would have adduced
we would have adduced
you would have adduced
they would have adduced
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.adduce - advance evidence foradduce - advance evidence for      
bear witness, evidence, testify, prove, show - provide evidence for; "The blood test showed that he was the father"; "Her behavior testified to her incompetence"

adduce

verb mention, offer, name, present, advance, quote, allege, cite, designate The evidence she adduced was authoritative.

adduce

verb
To bring forward for formal consideration:
Archaic: allege.
Translations

adduce

[əˈdjuːs] VT (frm) → alegar, aducir

adduce

vt (form)anführen; evidenceerbringen

adduce

[əˈdjuːs] vt (frm) (fact, reason) → addurre
References in classic literature ?
Let no one be surprised if, in speaking of entirely new principalities as I shall do, I adduce the highest examples both of prince and of state; because men, walking almost always in paths beaten by others, and following by imitation their deeds, are yet unable to keep entirely to the ways of others or attain to the power of those they imitate.
"In proof of which gentleness I adduce his adventure with the rabbit.
I don't think you have read ten pages of Spencer, but there have been critics, assumably more intelligent than you, who have read no more than you of Spencer, who publicly challenged his followers to adduce one single idea from all his writings - from Herbert Spencer's writings, the man who has impressed the stamp of his genius over the whole field of scientific research and modern thought; the father of psychology; the man who revolutionized pedagogy, so that to-day the child of the French peasant is taught the three R's according to principles laid down by him.
Yet the American citizen plumes himself upon this spirit, even when he is sufficiently dispassionate to perceive the ruin it works; and will often adduce it, in spite of his own reason, as an instance of the great sagacity and acuteness of the people, and their superior shrewdness and independence.
There is no evidence to adduce, and whether or not the man himself committed the murders there is now none to say.
But the Wellands always went to Newport, where they owned one of the square boxes on the cliffs, and their son-in-law could adduce no good reason why he and May should not join them there.
He said that he wrote the letter of representation to the AGC, claiming that this was done after the prosecution was unable to adduce evidence to sustain the charge brought against How.
Continuing, the judge described Chana's appeal bid as "naive" and said his attempts to adduce fresh evidence could not impact on the safety of the conviction.
They would correctly adduce that the City of London and its financial institutions shed more than 40,000 jobs last year alone.
His Honour stated that he did 'not read the reasons of Emmett J to go so far as to suggest that the burden shifts back to a representee once evidence has been adduced by the representor.' (94) Rather, Keane JA gave Emmett J's comments a narrow interpretation, holding that they simply 'advanc[e] the common sense proposition that, when a representor does adduce evidence attesting to reasonable grounds, it will be a matter for the court to determine if that evidence does establish reasonable grounds' before the deeming provision will cease to operate.
In our judgment the evidence of the four expert witnesses is capable of belief, it may afford a ground for allowing these appeals; there is a reasonable explanation for the failure to adduce the evidence in those proceedings.