lymphatic tissue

(redirected from adenoid tissue)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to adenoid tissue: adenoidectomy, enlarged adenoids

lymphatic tissue

n
(Anatomy) tissue, such as the lymph nodes, tonsils, spleen, and thymus, that produces lymphocytes. Also called: lymphoid tissue
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lymphatic tissue - tissue making up the lymphatic systemlymphatic tissue - tissue making up the lymphatic system
animal tissue - the tissue in the bodies of animals
faucial tonsil, palatine tonsil, tonsil, tonsilla - either of two masses of lymphatic tissue one on each side of the oral pharynx
spleen, lien - a large dark-red oval organ on the left side of the body between the stomach and the diaphragm; produces cells involved in immune responses
lymphatic system, systema lymphaticum - the interconnected system of spaces and vessels between body tissues and organs by which lymph circulates throughout the body
lymph gland, lymph node, node - the source of lymph and lymphocytes
adenoid, Luschka's tonsil, pharyngeal tonsil, third tonsil, tonsilla adenoidea, tonsilla pharyngealis - a collection of lymphatic tissue in the throat behind the uvula (on the posterior wall and roof of the nasopharynx); "hypertrophy of the pharyngeal tonsils is called adenoids"; "enlarged adenoids may restrict the breathing of children"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the adenoid tissue has been incriminated as a source of microorganisms causing the middle ear disease, adenoidectomy is a common procedure as a part of OME treatment.
However, adenoid tissue can persist or remain hypertrophied in adulthood as well owing to the effect of chronic persistent infection, allergy, smoking or other factors3,5.
The presence of biofilms on the surface of adenoid tissue has been established and numerous studies have shown a correlation between the presence of biofilms on the adenoid and the occurrence of chronic upper respiratory tract infections.
When we examined the nasopharynx with a mirror to visualize the adenoid tissue, we observed a foreign body in the choanae.
Techniques employed included suction electrocautery or coblation of the adenoid tissue.
During adenotonsillectomy under general anesthesia, three samples were collected from every patient: (a) nasopharyngeal wash (NPW): saline flushed into both nasal cavities and collected at the nasopharynx using a sterile syringe; (b) fragment of adenoid tissue (AD), collected with a conventional Beckman curette for adenoidectomy; and (c) fragment of palatine tonsil (PT) collected with a cold-knife scalpel.
The adenoid tissue is regarded as an important reservoir of pathogenic bacterial biofilms in children with recurrent infections [11, 20, 21].
The characteristic localization of TC and its characteristic pattern on MRI are the specific features that help distinguish TC from the adenoid tissue.6 TC can be easily missed if the nasopharyngeal space is not examined adequately and no CT or MRI scan is performed.
The mass was clearly not adenoid tissue, and a computed tomography (CT) scan of his face and sinuses with contrast was obtained.
The traditional surgical technique, which is performed blindly or under the view of laryngeal mirror using an adenoid curette or adenotome, has been challenged for inadequate reduction of hypertrophic adenoid tissue, especially in situations of involvement over the intranasal region, nasopharyngeal roof, and peritubal and retrotubal (pharyngeal recess) regions [1-5].
[sup][29] previously measured mRNA for TLR 1-10 in adenoid tissue, which led us to expect that isolated adenoidal epithelium may also contain mRNA for these TLRs.
Prior to surgery, the adenoid tissue was palpated and confirmed.