adenomatous


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ad·e·no·ma

 (ăd′n-ō′mə)
n. pl. ad·e·no·mas or ad·e·no·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
A benign epithelial tumor having a glandular origin and structure.

ad′e·nom′a·toid′ (ăd′n-ŏm′ə-toid′) adj.
ad′e·nom′a·tous (-ŏm′ə-təs) adj.

adenomatous

(ˌædɪˈnəʊmətəs)
adj
characterized by a collection of glandular growths
Translations

adenomatous

adj adenomatoso
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 PHARMA-August 28, 2019-Emtora Biosciences Awarded USD 3m CPRIT Grant to Study Efficacy of eRapa in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis
Cancer Prevention Pharmaceuticals, or CPP, and its partner Mallinckrodt announced that CPP's pivotal phase 3 clinical trial, CPP FAP-310, of the investigational drug CPP-1X/sulindac in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis, or FAP, did not meet its primary endpoint.
To develop the guideline, they searched the literature for studies of family history and colorectal cancer risk apart from hereditary Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis syndrome, Cowden syndrome, serrated (hyperplastic) polyposis syndrome, hereditary pancreatic cancer, and hereditary gastric cancer.
This model is particularly interesting because it resembles human familial adenomatous polyposis, a condition that carries an 80 per cent risk of developing colorectal cancer in individuals with mutations in a tumour suppressor gene called Apc, the study suggested.
Several types of hereditary polyposis syndromes have been described among hereditary CRC syndromes, including familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), familial juvenile polyposis, serrated polyposis, and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (3, 4).
However, rare cases with adenomatous and even malignant transformation have been reported.
Diversity of expression and clinical behavior of these tumors explain the variant terminology used to describe them, including middle ear adenoma, adenomatous tumor, neuroendocrine adenoma, carcinoid tumor, and mixed epithelial and neuroendocrine tumor [13, 14].
Desmoid tumors can occur sporadically; however they are most commonly associated with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) syndrome [4].
[6] It is generally accepted that 95% colorectal cancers arise from benign, neoplastic adenomatous polyps (adenomas).
Mesenteric and abdominal wall desmoid tumors are usually associated with familial adenomatous polyposis, which is caused by germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene.