adenosine


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Related to adenosine: amiodarone, atropine

a·den·o·sine

 (ə-dĕn′ə-sēn′)
n.
A nucleoside, C10H13N5O4, composed of adenine linked to ribose, that is a component of nucleic acids and of ADP, AMP, and ATP, and that plays a role in regulating various physiological functions.

[Blend of adenine and ribose.]

adenosine

(æˈdɛnəˌsiːn; ˌædɪˈnəʊsiːn)
n
(Biochemistry) biochem a nucleoside formed by the condensation of adenine and ribose. It is present in all living cells in a combined form, as in ribonucleic acids. Formula: C10H13N5O4
[C20: a blend of adenine + ribose]

a•den•o•sine

(əˈdɛn əˌsin, -sɪn)

n.
a white, crystalline, water-soluble nucleoside, C10H13N5O4, of adenine and ribose.
[< German Adenosin (1909), b. Adenin adenine and Ribose ribose]

a·den·o·sine

(ə-dĕn′ə-sēn′)
A compound, C10H13N5O4, that is found in living cells and is one of the nucleotides in DNA and is also a component of ADP, AMP, and ATP.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adenosine - (biochemistry) a nucleoside that is a structural component of nucleic acidsadenosine - (biochemistry) a nucleoside that is a structural component of nucleic acids; it is present in all living cells in a combined form as a constituent of DNA and RNA and ADP and ATP and AMP
biochemistry - the organic chemistry of compounds and processes occurring in organisms; the effort to understand biology within the context of chemistry
nucleoside - a glycoside formed by partial hydrolysis of a nucleic acid
Translations
adénosine

adenosine

n adenosina
References in periodicals archive ?
Adenosine Therapeutics has also completed a licensing agreement with the NIH to in-license a pending patent in the field of adenosine antagonists for the treatment of cancer and for improving the efficacy of vaccines: "Methods for Using Extra Cellular Adenosine Inhibitors and Adenosine Receptor Inhibitors to Enhance Immune Response and Inflammation.
Adenosine is a naturally occurring signal molecule that acts at multiple adenosine receptor subtypes (specialized proteins at the cell surface) to modulate key cardio-renal functions.
Here we describe a sensitive and specific adenosine-binding protein assay (ABPA) for detection of adenosine in samples that can be directly applied to deproteinized specimens.
Adenosine tri-phosphate is composed of three phosphates.
The second chapter focuses on adenosine end-uses, the third one gives summary on a number of patents.
While adenosine had shown potential for pain-killing in humans, researchers had not yet successfully leveraged this particular pain pathway because the targeted receptors engaged many side effects.
This compound had fewer adverse effects than caffeine since it only blocks only the A2A adenosine receptor subtype, and at the same time it is significantly more effective.
The effect of MTX-induced adenosine release has been studied in a number of in vivo models.
Zylka had already been studying PAP, which stands for prostatic acid phosphatase, when Nedergaard's research on the release of adenosine during acupuncture was published.
Masino and her colleagues found that mice with normal levels of adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) and a transgenic overexpression of adenosine kinase, an intracellular enzyme that negatively influences extracellular levels of adenosine, had a "near complete" reduction in the number and duration of spontaneous seizures.
During and after treatment, adenosine levels in the tissues were boosted.