adieu

(redirected from adieus)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

a·dieu

 (ə-dyo͞o′, ə-do͞o′)
interj.
Used to express farewell.
n. pl. a·dieus or a·dieux (ə-dyo͞oz′, ə-do͞oz′)
A farewell.

[Middle English, from Old French a dieu, (I commend you) to God : a, to (from Latin ad; see ad-) + Dieu, God (from Latin deus; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots).]

adieu

(əˈdjuː; French adjø)
sentence substitute, n, pl adieus or adieux (əˈdjuːz; French adjø)
goodbye; farewell
[C14: from Old French, from a to + dieu God]

a•dieu

(əˈdu, əˈdyu)

interj., n., pl. a•dieus, a•dieux.
good-bye; farewell.
[1325–75; < Middle French, literally, to God; compare adios]

adieu

A French word for farewell. The literal meaning is (I commend you) to God.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adieu - a farewell remarkadieu - a farewell remark; "they said their good-byes"
farewell, word of farewell - an acknowledgment or expression of goodwill at parting

adieu

noun goodbye, parting, farewell, leave-taking, valediction, congé We said our adieus and left.

adieu

noun
A separation of two or more people:
Translations
adieufarewell
agyő
zbogom

adieu

[əˈdjuː]
A. EXCL¡adiós!
B. N (adieus or adieux (pl)) [əˈdjuːz] (frm) → adiós m
to bid adieu to [+ person] → despedirse de; [+ thing] → renunciar a, abandonar
to say one's adieus or adieuxdespedirse

adieu

(old, liter)
nAdieu nt, → Lebewohl nt (old); to say one’s adieusAdieu or adieu sagen (old), → Abschied nehmen
interjadieu (old); to bid somebody adieujdm Adieu or adieu or Lebewohl sagen (old)

adieu

[əˈdjuː] naddio
References in classic literature ?
Adieu, adieu, adieu," she said, without the soul communicating one single intelligent inflexion to the word.
His present pursuit could not make him forget that Elizabeth had been the first to excite and to deserve his attention, the first to listen and to pity, the first to be admired; and in his manner of bidding her adieu, wishing her every enjoyment, reminding her of what she was to expect in Lady Catherine de Bourgh, and trusting their opinion of her-- their opinion of everybody-- would always coincide, there was a solicitude, an interest which she felt must ever attach her to him with a most sincere regard; and she parted from him convinced that, whether married or single, he must always be her model of the amiable and pleasing.
He arose from the oaken bench on which he was seated in the chapel, and wished, as the priest had done, to go and bid a last adieu to the double grave which contained his two lost friends.