adieu

(redirected from adieus)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

a·dieu

 (ə-dyo͞o′, ə-do͞o′)
interj.
Used to express farewell.
n. pl. a·dieus or a·dieux (ə-dyo͞oz′, ə-do͞oz′)
A farewell.

[Middle English, from Old French a dieu, (I commend you) to God : a, to (from Latin ad; see ad-) + Dieu, God (from Latin deus; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots).]

adieu

(əˈdjuː; French adjø)
sentence substitute, n, pl adieus or adieux (əˈdjuːz; French adjø)
goodbye; farewell
[C14: from Old French, from a to + dieu God]

a•dieu

(əˈdu, əˈdyu)

interj., n., pl. a•dieus, a•dieux.
good-bye; farewell.
[1325–75; < Middle French, literally, to God; compare adios]

adieu

A French word for farewell. The literal meaning is (I commend you) to God.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adieu - a farewell remarkadieu - a farewell remark; "they said their good-byes"
farewell, word of farewell - an acknowledgment or expression of goodwill at parting

adieu

noun goodbye, parting, farewell, leave-taking, valediction, congé We said our adieus and left.

adieu

noun
A separation of two or more people:
Translations
adieufarewell
agyő
zbogom

adieu

[əˈdjuː]
A. EXCL¡adiós!
B. N (adieus or adieux (pl)) [əˈdjuːz] (frm) → adiós m
to bid adieu to [+ person] → despedirse de; [+ thing] → renunciar a, abandonar
to say one's adieus or adieuxdespedirse

adieu

(old, liter)
nAdieu nt, → Lebewohl nt (old); to say one’s adieusAdieu or adieu sagen (old), → Abschied nehmen
interjadieu (old); to bid somebody adieujdm Adieu or adieu or Lebewohl sagen (old)

adieu

[əˈdjuː] naddio
References in classic literature ?
A few last words and tears, a few simple adieus and blessings, and clasping her wondering and affrighted child in her arms, she glided noiselessly away.
Many were the tears shed by them in their last adieus to a place so much beloved.
The last adieus were hastily exchanged, and Anna Miller was handed into her father's gig by Charles Weston in profound silence.
The gentlemen made their adieus as well as they could, and taking the middle of the road, which was a fine, wide, and well-beaten path, they did tolerably well until they reached the gate of the mansion-house: but on entering the Judge’s domains they encountered some slight difficulties.
By all their calculations there was just time for this; but as they drew near the Cobb, there was such a general wish to walk along it once more, all were so inclined, and Louisa soon grew so determined, that the difference of a quarter of an hour, it was found, would be no difference at all; so with all the kind leave-taking, and all the kind interchange of invitations and promises which may be imagined, they parted from Captain and Mrs Harville at their own door, and still accompanied by Captain Benwick, who seemed to cling to them to the last, proceeded to make the proper adieus to the Cobb.