adjectivally


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Related to adjectivally: adjective, resolutely

ad·jec·ti·val

 (ăj′ĭk-tī′vəl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or functioning as an adjective.

ad′jec·ti′val·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

adjectivally

(ˌædʒekˈtaɪvəlɪ) or

adjectively

adv
(Grammar) as an adjective
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.adjectivally - as an adjective; in an adjectival manner
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

adjectivally

[ˌædʒekˈtaɪvəlɪ] ADVadjetivamente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

adjectivally

[ˌædʒɛkˈtaɪvlɪ] advcon funzione di aggettivo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Decem is, indeed, why even the mathematical system based on 10 is known adjectivally as decimal.
All I was doing was listing them, adjectivally: Mercedes-made, Audi-made, Toyota-made, Mitsubishi-made.
In this debate, the notion of development, as an objective, would sometimes be denied (post-development criticism), in others adjectivally and partially questioned (human development, sustainable, community development, with a gender perspective...), and sometimes replaced by related concepts such as wellbeing, happiness and so on.
(6) The naivete of the sensibilities of the domestics, accompanied by the naive (but also "coarse" and "vulgar") style through which they express themselves, make their inclusion seemingly improper (or fanciful) when juxtaposed with the "sublime" representations of the more elevated characters that adjectivally relate to the representations of "grave," "melancholy," "dignified," "serious," "important," "pathetic" sensations.
(1) Pentecostal is capitalized when used as a noun or when referring to the group of people related to this movement, but uncapitalized when used adjectivally; pentecostal-charismatic are used relatively synonymously in this essay, although there are also important distinctions that are elaborated upon in my The Spirit Poured Out on All Flesh: Pentecostalism and the Possibility of Global Theology (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2005), 14-18.
Entities represented as extended noun groups are underlined and qualities expressed adjectivally are double underlined.
His interjection 'now', together with the first use of a verb ('is') that does not adjectivally modify his subject, establishes the tense, and Gaunt's condemnation of what is 'now' explicitly identifies the present.
(50.) Being a representative as the principal role of a government actor is different from the adjectivally "representative" characteristics of all government actors.
But then again, in New South Wales Public Service Association, (59) where Judges in the same persona designata setting as Wainohu were required (no discretion!) to apply government policy--the policy of the executive--not just adjectivally, in deciding whether to give reasons or not, but in determining substantive rights, the challenge to that was dismissed in a majority judgment of only three pages.
Rather than identifying discipline and sovereign power as Foucault does as 'technologies of power', he uses the terms 'sovereignty', 'discipline' and 'control' adjectivally, speaking of 'disciplinary societies'.
prominent phrase involves the term "reasonable" adjectivally