admiral


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ad·mi·ral

 (ăd′mər-əl)
n.
1. The commander in chief of a fleet.
2. A flag officer.
3.
a. A commissioned rank in the US Navy or Coast Guard that is above vice admiral and below Admiral of the Fleet.
b. One who holds the rank of admiral, Admiral of the Fleet, rear admiral, or vice admiral.
4. Any of various brightly colored nymphalid butterflies of the genera Limenitis and Vanessa, especially V. atalanta, having black wings with red bands.
5. Archaic The ship carrying an admiral; flagship.

[Middle English amiral, admiral, Muslim military commander, emir, admiral, ultimately (partly via Old French amiral) from Medieval Latin admīrālis, alteration (influenced by admīrārī, to wonder at, admire) of amīrālis, ultimately (possibly via Medieval Greek ameras, amerad-) from Arabic 'amīr, commander; see ʔmr in Semitic roots + Latin -ālis, noun suffix. Alternatively, both Old French amiral and Medieval Latin amīrālis ultimately from Arabic 'amīr-al-'ālī, the high commander ('amīr + al, the + 'ālī, high; see ʕly in Semitic roots).]

admiral

(ˈædmərəl)
n
1. (Military) the supreme commander of a fleet or navy
2. (Military) Also called: admiral of the fleet or fleet admiral a naval officer of the highest rank, equivalent to general of the army or field marshal
3. (Military) a senior naval officer entitled to fly his own flag. See also rear admiral, vice admiral
4. (Nautical Terms) chiefly Brit the master of a fishing fleet
5. (Animals) any of various nymphalid butterflies, esp the red admiral or white admiral
[C13: amyral, from Old French amiral emir, and from Medieval Latin admīrālis (the spelling with d probably influenced by admīrābilis admirable); both from Arabic amīr emir, commander, esp in the phrase amīr-al commander of, as in amīr-al-bahr commander of the sea]
ˈadmiralˌship n

ad•mi•ral

(ˈæd mər əl)

n.
1. the commander in chief of a fleet.
2. (in the U.S. Navy)
a. a high-ranking officer, next above vice-admiral.
b. an officer of any of the four highest ranks: rear admiral, vice-admiral, admiral, and fleet admiral.
3. any of several brightly colored butterflies of the genera Vanessa and Basilarchia, as the red admiral, V. atalanta rubria.
4. Obs. the flagship of an admiral.
[1175–1225; Middle English, variant of amiral < Old French < Arabic amīr al commander of the amīr al-mu'minīn commander of the faithful]
ad′mi•ral•ship`, n.

admiral

- First used in English to mean "an emir or prince under the Sultan," coming from Arabic amir al, "commander of"; admiral was originally a sea lord due to the office of amir-al-bahr or amir-al-ma (Arabic), "ameer/emir of the sea."
See also related terms for prince.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.admiral - the supreme commander of a fleetadmiral - the supreme commander of a fleet; ranks above a vice admiral and below a fleet admiral
flag officer - a senior naval officer above the rank of captain
2.admiral - any of several brightly colored butterfliesadmiral - any of several brightly colored butterflies
brush-footed butterfly, four-footed butterfly, nymphalid, nymphalid butterfly - medium to large butterflies found worldwide typically having brightly colored wings and much-reduced nonfunctional forelegs carried folded on the breast
Translations
أمِير البَحْر، أمِيرَال
admirál
admiral
tengernagy
flotaforingi
admirolas
admirālis
admirál
admiral

admiral

[ˈædmərəl] Nalmirante mf

admiral

[ˈædmərəl] n (in the army, navy)amiral m
Admiral Hodges → l'amiral Hodges

admiral

nAdmiral(in) m(f); Admiral of the Fleet (Brit) → Großadmiral(in) m(f) ? red admiral

admiral

[ˈædmrəl] nammiraglio

admiral

(ˈӕdmərəl) noun
(with capital in titles) the commander of a navy.
References in classic literature ?
Admiral Nelson, also, on a capstan of gun-metal, stands his mast-head in Trafalgar Square; and ever when most obscured by that London smoke, token is yet given that a hidden hero is there; for where there is smoke, must be fire.
The speaker sank into one of the big armchairs, and Admiral Dewey crouched beneath it; he did not snarl again, but he never took his eyes off Jurgis.
The first is Admiral Bartram; supposed to have been under friendly obligations, in past years, to Mr.
I am sure when I think of the fellow now, my blood rises against him with the disinterested indignation I should feel if I could have known all about him without having ever been in his power; but it rises hotly, because I know him to have been an incapable brute, who had no more right to be possessed of the great trust he held, than to be Lord High Admiral, or Commander-in-Chief - in either of which capacities it is probable that he would have done infinitely less mischief.
Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I take up my pen in the year of grace 17 and go back to the time when my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old seaman with the sabre cut first took up his lodging under our roof.
That minister was GALBET, or admiral of the realm, very much in his master's confidence, and a person well versed in affairs, but of a morose and sour complexion.
His name and his bright past, seen through the prism of whispered gossip, had gained him the nickname of THE ADMIRAL.
Departing this life as Admiral of the Fleet on the eve of the Crimean War, Sir Thomas Byam Martin has recorded for us amongst his all too short autobiographical notes these few characteristic words uttered by one young man of the many who must have felt that particular inconvenience of a heroic age.
On this buccaneering expedition, Rear Admiral Du Petit Thouars, leaving the rest of his squadron at the Marquesas,--which had then been occupied by his forces about five months--set sail for the doomed island in the Reine Blanche frigate.
You chose to consult the Admiral before you made up your mind.
When the maneuver had been completed, the vessel which bore the admiral saluted France by twelve discharges of cannon, which were returned, discharge for discharge, from Fort Francis I.
If a rich admiral were to come in our way, Sir Walter--"